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    Two in Relation Paid Member

    To view the Oxherding portfolio, as featured in the Spring 2011 issue of Tricycle, click here. Lewis Hyde is a poet, essayist, translator, and culture critic. Of his 1983 book, The Gift, David Foster Wallace said, “No one who is invested in any kind of art can read The Gift and remain unchanged.” A MacArthur Fellow and former director of undergraduate creative writing at Harvard University, Hyde teaches during the fall semesters at Kenyon College, where he is the Richard L. Thomas Professor of Creative Writing. During the rest of the year he lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he is a Fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society. More »
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    Oxherding poems Paid Member

    One Word Oxherding More »
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    Oxherding Paid Member

    The set of poems and drawings known as the Oxherding series presents a parable about the conduct of Buddhist practice. In the most common version, attributed to a 12th-century Chinese Zen master, there are ten drawings, the first of which shows a young herder who has lost the ox he is supposed to be tending. In subsequent images he finds the ox’s tracks, sees the beast itself, tames it, and rides it home. In the seventh drawing the ox disappears: it “served a temporary purpose,” the accompanying poem says; it was a metaphor for something, not to be mistaken for the thing itself. The herder too disappears in the next drawing; the image simply shows a circle (Japanese, enso), a common symbol for enlightenment. The ninth drawing implies that the person who has achieved enlightenment does not then retreat from the world; called “Returning to the Roots, Going Back to the Source,” it usually shows a scene from nature. More »
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    Great Swan Paid Member

    These tantric songs are excerpted from the forthcoming Great Swan: Meetings with Ramakrishna, by Lex Hixon. Great Swan is a dramatic retelling of the life of Ramakrishna (1836-1886), a Hindu priest who devoted himself to the worship of the goddess Kali. For twelve years he engaged in several practices including Christian and Islamic, and eventually, through personal experience, realized the universal truth inherent in all religions. His teachings, transmitted informally and recorded by a disciple, are translated into English as The Gospel of Ramakrishna. It is this record, in addition to other eyewitness accounts, that Lex Hixon draws on to create a powerful contemporary portrait of Ramakrishna, known to nis disciples as Paramahamsa, or the Great Swan. More »
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    Duane Michals Paid Member

        Photographer Duane Michals lives in New York; his books include Now Becoming Then (Twelvetrees Press). More »
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    Heart Print Paid Member

    When Brice Marden saw the "Masters of Japanese Calligraphy" exhibition at New York's Asia Society in 1984, he was so captivated by the beauty and authority of the work, by the living energy of the drawn lines, that he kept a copy of the catalogue with him wherever he went. For the first time, he saw calligraphy as drawing. And drawing for Marden—like calligraphy for the Japanese and Chinese—is "the most direct form of all artistic expression." Long a believer that art is a form of spiritual communication, Marden felt an affinity with this work, which evolved in a kind of inspired state. In fact, the Chinese expression for a piece of Zen calligraphy is "heart print." More »