online retreats

  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Mindfulness and Difficult Emotions Paid Member

    I’ve heard some wonderful explanations of mindfulness. The writer and teacher Sylvia Boorstein calls it “awake attention to what is happening inside and outside so we can respond from a place of wisdom.” The Vietnamese Zen teacher and poet Thich Nhat Hanh says, “I like to define mindfulness as the energy that helps us to be there 100 percent. It is the energy of your true presence.” But my favorite definition comes from a fifth grader at Piedmont Avenue Elementary School in Oakland, California.  More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Balancing Emotions Paid Member

    Balancing Emotions means gaining control over the mood and outlook we bring to everything we do. Our inner emotions have an enormous effect on our experience, often impeding our inner growth. Balancing our emotional energy can create a significant shift in our inner well-being, creating new levels of inner strength and tranquility. —The Juniper School More »
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Healing Ecology Paid Member

  • Tricycle Community 15 comments

    Now What? Paid Member

  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    The Four Protective Meditations Paid Member

    Watch Bhikkhu Bodhi's retreat here. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    The Whole of the Path Paid Member

    In the last few years, I’ve chosen to use the Metta Sutta, the Buddha’s sermon on impartial kindness, as my principal text. I’ve been particularly interested in teaching the Metta Sutta because I think it presents an overview of the entire practice path that the Buddha taught. It begins with the challenging and inspiring line, “This is what should be done by one who is skilled in goodness and who knows the path of peace,” and continues with instructions for morality practice, mental discipline, and the cultivation of wisdom. I love that this text is totally unequivocal. The cultivation of unshakable goodwill toward all beings, “omitting none”—a practice made possible through the “gladness and safety” that is the fruit of firm ethics—liberates the mind from “fixed views” so that its essential peace is undisturbed. More »