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    Aide to Tibet In a move that marks a new era in American diplomatic relations with Tibet, Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright announced in July that she would appoint a "special coordinator" to handle American policy toward the beleaguered Himalayan nation. In October, Albright named State Department Director of Policy Planning Greg Craig to the position. The United States has never had diplomatic relations with Tibet and regards Tibet as part of the People's Republic of China. But the creation of the new position did not please the Chinese. The state-endorsed China Daily commented, "No one has received an invitation to do such a 'favor' for China. . . .No one has even asked China's opinion of such a move, in which the U.S. again takes a hand in another's domestic affairs." More »
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    PRETENDER TO THE THRONE In our last issue we reported on the outrage of Chinese officials when the Dalai Lama announced that a six-year­ old Tibetan boy, Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, had been determined to be the reincarnation of the tenth Panchen Lama, who died in January 1989. The Chinese government claimed that, under the terms ofa 1792 Qing Dynasty agreement, they had the right to approve the selection of all important lamas found in Tibet. Now the Chinese government has installed its own selection, six-year­ old Gyaincain Norbu, thus effectively creating a rival Panchen Lama. More »
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    PAGODA SIEGEVietnam's communist government intensified its crackdown on the Unified Buddhist Church (UBC) when more than 200 armed security forces raided a 400-year-old pagoda in Hue and arrested two prominent monks there in November. The International Buddhist Information Bureau, a foreign organ of the UBC, said that the raid was part of a government plan to evict UBC monks from the Linh Mu pagoda, a treasured monument and longtime center of Buddhist activism, and place it under the charge of the state­sponsored Vietnamese Buddhist Church. Both monks arrested in the siege, Thich Hai Thinh and Thich Hai Chahn, had already served time in Vietnamese jails for supporting the UBC in a 1993 march for religious freedom. More »
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    In Memorium On November 2, 1997, the Venerable Ayya Khema, whose Buddhist name means "safety and security," died of cancer at the age of 74. The author of twenty-five books on meditation and the Buddha's teachings, she was best known in the United States for her best-selling book Being Nobody: Meditations on the Buddhist Path. She was ordained a Buddhist nun in Sri Lanka in 1979 and was one of the first pioneers to work on behalf of women in the dharma. More »
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    In the News Summer 2001 Paid Member

    Fading Hope The Dalai Lama makes a much-anticipated return to the United Stares this May. During his monthlong stay he will visit the cities of Minneapolis, Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Jose, and Salt Lake City. Public events in the six cities have been sold out weeks in advance, with some organizers scrambling to add seats to venues booked at full capacity. In Utah, for example, an estimated 10,000 tickets were sold two months in advance of a May 12 teaching date, a response well above even the most optimistic expectations. More »
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    CHANGE YOUR MIND At 12:30 p.m. on June 8, Michelle Laporte struck a large brass gong 108 times to initiate Tricycle's third annual Change Your Mind Day. The setting for this day of meditation in a free and public format was a quiet wooded lawn in New York’s Central Park. The Reverend T. Kenjitsu Nakagaki from the New York Buddhist Church opened the presentations with a vigorous chant. Pat Enkyo O’Hara of the Village Zendo, a co-host of the event, led a guided meditation. A talk by Lobsang Samten of the Tibetan Buddhist Center of Philadelphia followed. Next, John Daido Loori, abbot of Zen Mountain Monastery, took questions from the audience. More »