in memoriam

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    In Memoriam: Anagarika Munindra (1914-2003) Paid Member

    Achariya Anagarika Munindra, affectionately known as “Munindraji,” passed away the morning of October 14, 2003, following a long illness. He was eighty-nine years old. A meditation master and Pali scholar, Munindra introduced many of today’s notable Western teachers to Vipassana practice. Revered for his gentleness, wisdom, and insatiable curiosity, Munindra translated his devotion to Buddhist practice and profound knowledge of the Pali canon into a dharma readily accessible to Westerners. Munindra was born in Chittagong, Bangladesh, to the Barua family, descendents of the original Buddhists of India forced east by the eleventh-century Muslim invasion. During the 1940s he traveled to India to serve with the Mahabodhi Society of India in Sarnath, an organization devoted to preserving India’s Buddhist history, and in the 1950s he was appointed superintendent of the Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya, the site of the Buddha’s enlightenment. More »
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    The Kindest of Friends Paid Member

    Ribur Rinpoche (1923-2006) A beloved Tibetan teacher in the Gelugpa tradition, Ribur Rinpoche passed away in January 2006. Born in the Kham region of Tibet in 1923, he received his geshe degree at Sera Me monastery in 1948. After suffering many years of abuse in Tibet under Chinese rule, he was exiled to India in 1985 and eventually came to teach in the United States. More »
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    Kobun Chino Roshi Paid Member

    Kobun Chino Roshi (1938—2002) Kobun Chino Otogawa Roshi, Zen teacher and holder of the World Wisdom Chair at Naropa University, died in a drowning accident in Switzerland on July 26 while he was attempting to rescue his five-year-old daughter, Maya, who also died. He was sixty-four years old. More »
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    Philip Whalen (1923-2002) Paid Member

    Philip Whalen, Zen priest, abbot of San Francisco’s Hartford Street Zen Center, and Beat poet, died on June 26, 2002, at the age of seventy-eight, after a prolonged illness. Born in Portland, Oregon in 1923, Whalen was associated with the West Coast Beats and appeared with Allen Ginsberg and Gary Snyder in the legendary Gallery Six reading in 1955, which brought the San Francisco Poetry Renaissance to national attention. “[He was] one of the most influential and inspiring poets of the last century,” according to poet Anne Waldman of Naropa University. Whalen’s interest in Buddhism first led him to Japan, and then to the San Francisco Zen Center, where he ordained as a priest with Richard Baker Roshi in 1973, eventually receiving the dharma name Zenshin Ryufu. More »
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    Master Seung Sahn (1927-2004) Paid Member

    Coming empty-handed, going empty-handed—that is human. When you are born, where do you come from? When you die, where do you go? Life is like a floating cloud which appears. Death is like a floating cloud which disappears. The floating cloud itself originally does not exist. Life and death, coming and going, are also like that. But there is one thing which always remains clear. It is pure and clear, not depending on life and death.Then what is the one pure and clear thing?  —From a favorite teaching verse of Zen Master Seung Sahn. More »
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    Ani Pachen Dolma (1933-2002) Paid Member

    Ani Pachen Dolma, the Tibetan nun made legendary for her leadership in resistance to the Chinese occupation of Tibet and for her subsequent twenty-one-year imprisonment, died of heart failure at her home in Dharamsala, India, on February 2, 2002. She was sixty-nine years old. The only child of a powerful Tibetan chieftain, Ani Pachen was training to become a nun in 1950 when the Chinese invaded Tibet. In 1958, after the death of her father, she left her spiritual practice to take his place, leading her people into the hills in a guerilla campaign against the Chinese invaders.More »