letters

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Letters to the Editor Winter 2003 Paid Member

    A Huxley Hoax?We’ve learned so much about Buddhism since Huxley was alive, I was surprised that Dana Sawyer simply reported Huxley’s judgments about Buddhism without checking to see if they were still valid or not [“Aldous Huxley’s Truth Beyond Tradition,” Fall 2003]. Did Huxley really know enough about Theravada meditation or Pure Land devotionalism to make accurate judgments about them? In The Perennial Philosophy, did he really identify the subtext of all great spiritual traditions? Or did he simply cite writings that coincided with his own personal preferences? A glance at the first chapter of that book is enough to make you wonder if he really understood what the teaching on nonself was all about. It would be useful to have an article that accurately assessed these issues. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Letters to the Editor Paid Member

    AUSPICIOUS BEGINNINGS The first issue of Tricycle was superb—a most auspicious beginning. I especially enjoyed Joel McCleary's fine tribute to Geshe Wangyal, Dean Rolston's moving "Memento Mori," and the delightfully unorthodox Spalding Gray interview with His Holiness the Dalai Lama. The quality of the writing was very high and was matched by a marriage of intelligence, wit, and deep feeling, all qualities much needed in the kind of times we now live in. The time has surely come for the years of practice by American Buddhists to bear fruit in a new activism to begin to create a decent, sane, and just society. NICK PEARSON Weston, Massachusetts More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Letters to the Editor Spring 2002 Paid Member

    Tricycle welcomes letters to the editor. Letters are subject to editing. Please send correspondence to: Tricycle: The Buddhist Review92 Vandam StreetNew York, NY 10013Fax: (212) 645-1493E-mail address: editorial@tricycle.com Absolute Dharma? In his illuminating article “One Dharma” (Winter 2001), Joseph Goldstein rightly points out that non-clinging is fundamental to all Buddhist traditions. However, he misleads when he proposes that we think of Buddhism as a “basic pragmatism, rather than an adherence to some philosophical system,” and Buddhist teachings as “skillful means for liberating the mind, rather than statements of absolute truth.”More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Letters to the Editor Paid Member

    Lama Drama If Thinley Norbu Rinpoche has the severe philosophical and practical problems with Western Buddhist teachers, groups, and students that he claims to have, then it should be plain and clear that factual examples need to be given support to these very serious criticisms. If this chafing indeed exists as he says, then it needs to be openly aired, not further irritated by keeping it under cover (this is mainly the job of the journalist, not the interviewee). I would hope the spirit of open and honest inquiry is present whether you are interviewing a Tulku or a first-year student or a person hostile to the dharma. I find it difficult to believe that the interviewer didn’t ask the obvious “Who?” More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Letters to the Editor Paid Member

    Occidentals on Orientalism More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Letters to the Editor Paid Member

    Skillful ScenesDo Buddhists believe in God? It seems that they do! I read in your recent report on religious leaders’ opposition to the patenting of animals [“In the News,” Fall 1995], that four well known Buddhist leaders: Robert Aitken Roshi, Jack Kornfield, Tenshin Reb Anderson and Stephanie Kaza had signed a statement: “We believe that humans and animals are creations of God, not humans, and as such should not be patented as human inventions.” Clearly we have to wonder if they really did sign the document or, if they did, were they in some way tricked into endorsing a statement which so obviously goes against basic Buddhist teachings? At meetings of “religious leaders” one frequently finds that seemingly knowledgeable and kindly Christian and Jewish participants insist, in the face of all evidence to the contrary, that Buddhists too, in their own way, believe in the same God, creator of the universe. More »