interview

  • Tricycle Community 19 comments

    Just Shut Up Paid Member

    Robert Campbell Chodo began using amphetamines and alcohol at age 16. He continued using amphetamines until age 24, before moving on to cocaine for the next 10 years. In 1988, Campbell got sober after seeing a psychotherapist and joining Alcoholics Anonymous, where he attended meetings 3 times a week. While Campbell says that “AA unquestionably gave me the tools to make the life changes,” it wasn’t until he began his Zen practice in 1993 that he began to get “really, really sober.” Today Campbell is one of the Executive Directors for New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care, an organization that provides direct care to the sick, dying, and suffering. More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Buddhist Training for Modern Life Paid Member

    Segyu Rinpoche is not your typical Tibetan monk. Born to Brazilian parents in Rio de Janeiro, he trained as an electrical engineer before becoming a master healer in Brazil’s rich healing tradition. Later drawn to the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, he studied for 25 years under the guidance of Gelug master Kyabje Lati Rinpoche (1922–2010), former abbot of Tibet’s Gaden Shartse Monastery. In 1983, shortly after arriving in the United States, he was recognized by the head of the Gelug school as holder of the Tibetan Buddhist lineage known as the Segyu. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Sex, Sin, and Zen Paid Member

    Brad Warner is known around the Buddhist world as the proprietor of the rollicking blog Hardcore Zen (hardcorezen.blogspot.com), and a contributor to the alternative adult site Suicide Girls (suicidegirls.com), as well as the author of irreverent and very personal books about Zen practice, most recently Sex, Sin, and Zen. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    A Lama for All Seasons Paid Member

    Tricycle: Your own tradition is the Gelugpa school of Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. How would you define Vajrayana? Gelek Rinpoche: The purpose of Buddhism is to cut down anger, hatred, and jealousy. The way you do it is very simple. If you cannot handle an attachment, then you completely cut out whatever helps the attachment grow. It comes down to discipline. Theravadin teachings encourage a very strict discipline. The Mahayana approach is slightly different. You make use of your attachment in order to benefit others. In the Mahayana, attachment can be a useful tool for a bodhisattva. Tricycle: Can you give a specific example of that? More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    The Great Compassion Paid Member

    Patricia Kanaya Usuki was born in Toronto, Canada, to an Anglican father and a Buddhist mother. Her parents brought her up in the United Church of Canada, one of the few Canadian religious institutions that welcomed people of Asian heritage. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Ten Years, One Page at a Time Paid Member

    What motivated you to start Tricycle? Until Tricycle, there was no independent voice of dharma. All the Buddhist magazines were community organs; they disseminated the teachings of a particular teacher or sect or lineage. So there was no forum for Buddhists of different traditions to speak to each other. And a few of us who had worked on community publications—in particular, Rick Fields—started talking about a nonsectarian, independent magazine.It was conceived of as a Buddhist magazine for Buddhists? It was always a twofold mission: to create an open forum for different kinds of Buddhists, and to create a conversation between Buddhists and non-Buddhists—and the timing seemed right for that.What made the timing right? More »