interview

  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    A Lama For All Seasons Paid Member

    Tricycle: Your own tradition is the Gelugpa school of Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. How would you define Vajrayana? Gelek Rinpoche: The purpose of Buddhism is to cut down anger, hatred, and jealousy. The way you do it is very simple. If you cannot handle an attachment, then you completely cut out whatever helps the attachment grow. It comes down to discipline. Theravadin teachings encourage a very strict discipline. The Mahayana approach is slightly different. You make use of your attachment in order to benefit others. In the Mahayana, attachment can be a useful tool for a bodhisattva. Tricycle: Can you give a specific example of that? More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    The Great Compassion Paid Member

    Patricia Kanaya Usuki was born in Toronto, Canada, to an Anglican father and a Buddhist mother. Her parents brought her up in the United Church of Canada, one of the few Canadian religious institutions that welcomed people of Asian heritage. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Ten Years, One Page at a Time Paid Member

    What motivated you to start Tricycle? Until Tricycle, there was no independent voice of dharma. All the Buddhist magazines were community organs; they disseminated the teachings of a particular teacher or sect or lineage. So there was no forum for Buddhists of different traditions to speak to each other. And a few of us who had worked on community publications—in particular, Rick Fields—started talking about a nonsectarian, independent magazine.It was conceived of as a Buddhist magazine for Buddhists? It was always a twofold mission: to create an open forum for different kinds of Buddhists, and to create a conversation between Buddhists and non-Buddhists—and the timing seemed right for that.What made the timing right? More »
  • Tricycle Community 137 comments

    Human Nature, Buddha Nature Paid Member

    In the 1980s, John Welwood emerged as a pioneer in illuminating the relationship between Western psychotherapy and Buddhist practice. The former director of the East/West psychology program at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, he is currently associate editor of the Journal of Transpersonal Psychology. Welwood has published numerous articles and books on the subjects of relationship, psychotherapy, consciousness, and personal change, including the bestselling Journey of the Heart. His idea of “spiritual bypassing” has become a key concept in how many understand the pitfalls of long-term spiritual practice. Psychotherapist Tina Fossella spoke with Welwood about how the concept has developed since he introduced it 30 years ago. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    The Garden & The Sword Paid Member

    “Many lives ago I stood where you are standing,” writes W. S. Merwin in his poem “Fox Sleep,” “and they assembled in front of me and I spoke to them/ about waking until one day one of them asked me/ When someone has wakened to what is really there/ is that person free of the chain of consequences/ and I answered Yes and with that I turned into a fox.” The poem paraphrases Case 2 of the koan collection The Gateless Barrier, a case called “Pai-chang and the Fox.” The koan deals with the nature of liberated activity within the realm of cause and effect, and it is one of the most widely commented-upon koans in Zen literature. But you won’t likely hear the new U.S. Poet Laureate talking about it. More »