insights

  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Bite-Sized Buddhism Paid Member

    If you can practice even when distracted, you are well trained. If you are a good horseback rider, your mind can wander but you don’t fall off your horse. In the same way, whatever circumstances you encounter, if you are well trained in meditation, you don’t get swept away by emotions. Instead, they perk you up and your awareness increases.Abandon any hope of fruition. The key instruction is to stay in the present. Don’t get caught up in hopes of what you’ll achieve and how good your situation will be some day in the future. What you do right now is what matters.Two activities: one at the beginning, one at the end. More »
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    Buddha Buzz Spring 2004 Paid Member

    The Envelope, PleaseMonks at Sherab Ling Monastery in India may soon have a new statue to add to their collection. Their album, Sacred Tibetan Chant, has been nominated for the 2003 Grammy award for best traditional world music album. The album records Karma Kagyu lineage prayers, Mahakala pujas (a ritual to overcome obstacles in one’s life), and merit dedications for all sentient beings. Other “Buddhist” songs that have been past Grammy nominees include Eminem’s “Lose Yourself” and Bob Dylan’s “Gonna Change My Way of Thinking.” Breathing Out, I Scrum More »
  • Tricycle Community 15 comments

    Searching for Self Paid Member

    Holding to an ordinary notion of self, or ego, is the source of all our pain and confusion. The irony is that when we look for this "self" that we're cherishing and protecting, we can't even find it. The self is shifty and ungraspable. When we say "I'm old," we're referring to our body as self. When we say "my body," the self becomes the owner of the body. When we say "I'm tired," the self is equated with physical or emotional feelings. The self is our perceptions when we say "I see," and our thoughts when we say "I think." When we can't find a self within or outside of these parts, we may then conclude that the self is that which is aware of all of these things—the knower or mind. More »
  • Tricycle Community 11 comments

    The Zen of Confidence Paid Member

    My hope is that all practitioners of the Way completely believe in their true self. You should neither lack confidence nor give rise to pride.Mind is fundamentally equal and the same, and thus there is no real distinction between "ordinary people" and "sages." Nevertheless there are, in reality, those who wander in darkness and those who have been awakened to their true nature, thus distinguishing "ordinary people" from "sages." Following the instruction of a teacher, a practitioner may attain, in an instant, his true self, thereby realizing that he is ultimately no different from the Buddha. Hence it is said, "Originally, there is nothing," which means simply that one must not underestimate oneself, and lack confidence. This is the teaching of "sudden enlightenment." More »
  • Tricycle Community 18 comments

    Selective Wisdom Paid Member

    For most of us born in the Western world, remote from Buddhism of any institutional kind, knowledge of the dhamma has come entirely from books and, occasionally, spoken words, some quite excellent and informative, certainly. But this kind of learning still retains a somewhat ethereal air in the absence of actions, traditions, and spiritual observances in which we can participate. That the Buddhist religion has survived so long in the world is a result not so much of the durability of manuscripts as of the power of ideas embodied in custom; and custom, for all our abundant sources of information, is what we lack and cannot in the long run do without. Books crumble easily enough; thought crumbles faster, if not made firm by some sort of concrete practice that holds together believers and sees to the transmission of the teaching to the young. More »
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    The Zen of Confidence Paid Member

    For many Korean Zen practitioners, Chinese Zen master So Sahn’s compendium of teachings The Mirror of Zen is second in importance only to the Buddha’s teachings. Here, he comments on importance and risk of self-confidence. More »