insights

  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Golden Retrievals Paid Member

    Fetch? Balls and sticks capture my attentionseconds at a time. Catch? I don’t think so.Bunny, tumbling leaf, a squirrel who’s–ohJoy—actually scared. Sniff the wind, then I’m off again: muck, pond, ditch, residueof any thrillingly dead thing. And you?Either you’re sunk in the past, half our walk,thinking of what you never can bring back, or else you’re off in some fog concerning—tomorrow, is that what you call it? My work:to unsnare time’s warp (and woof!), retrieving,my haze-headed friend, you. This shining bark, a Zen master’s bronzy gong, calls you here,entirely, now: bow-wow, bow-wow, bow-wow. From Sweet Machine: Poems, © 1998 by Mark Doty. Reprinted with permission of Harper Perennial.   More »
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    Rich Generosity Paid Member

    When a candle is lit in a dark room, it illuminates the room to some extent, but its power is limited. But if you use the same candle to light another candle, the total brightness increases. If you continue to do this, you can fill the room with brilliant illumination. The idea of transferring merit to others is like this. If we keep our own light selfishly hidden, it will only provide a limited amount of illumination. But when we share our light with others, we do not diminish our own light. Rather, we increase the amount of light available to all. Therefore, when others light our candle, we issue forth light. When out of gratitude we use our candle to light other people’s candles, the whole room gets brighter. This is why we transfer merit to others. This kind of light is continuous and inexhaustible. More »
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    A Quiver of the Heart Paid Member

    © Rami Efal Compassion is known in Buddhist teaching as the quivering of the heart in response to pain or suffering. Finding the right relationship to pain, both ours and that of others, is very complex, because pain can be a tremendously powerful teacher and an opening. It can also be the cause of terrible anger and separation. We can be filled with loneliness and resentment because we’re in pain; we can feel very isolated because we’re in pain; we can feel a lot of guilt in a state of grief, blaming ourselves for something we did or something we didn’t do or something we didn’t say. We can blame ourselves for seemingly being ineffectual in a world that needs so much help. More »
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    Zen Shorts Paid Member

    ZEN AND PSYCHOLOGY Many Zen Students and even a few teachers think Zen is a kind of psychology. This is a little like thinking that persimmons are a type of banana. The Zen master is more like a flea than he or she is like a psychologist. More like a cool breeze. More like a mountain peak. I am not exaggerating or being fanciful.THERAPY More »
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    A Slow, True Path Paid Member

    THIS I BELIEVE: That phenomena do not have any kind of demonstrable, intrinsic existence. That anything that is the composite sum of other parts is, logically, impermanent. That suffering is a given in any form of existence where confusion and ignorance are present. That when confusion and ignorance have been definitively eliminated, and goodness, caring, and wisdom have entirely taken their place, that is true happiness. More »
  • Tricycle Community 16 comments

    Thinking Big Paid Member

    WHEN WE RAISE a thought for someone’s well-being, and entrust that to our foundation, that underlying mind—Juingong—never disappears and is never used up. This is different from helping people through material things. This is the unconditional love that bodhisattvas have for all beings. This mind is the compassion that rises when all beings and myself are one, when the suffering of others is my suffering. This is the power that leads us to the truth. More »