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    The Mahabodhi Express Paid Member

    I ARRIVED TOO LATE on the last night of the Kagy Monlam to receive one of the battery-operated candles that glowed like an old-fashioned Christmas bulb, turned on and off with a twirl of the faux brass base. Thousands of them had been somewhat miraculously obtained and distributed by the Chinese groups who sponsored this year’s Kagyu Monlam, one of many traditional Tibetan Buddhist prayer festivals held each winter in Bodh Gaya. More »
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    Immaterial Evidence Paid Member

    ALL THE GREAT REVOLUTIONS in science have been catalyzed by sophisticated observations of natural phenomena. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, decades of empirical studies of celestial and terrestrial physical phenomena by Tycho Brahe and Galileo laid the foundation for Newton’s discovery of the laws of classical mechanics. In the nineteenth century, Darwin’s decades of painstaking empirical observations of biological phenomena enabled him to formulate his theory of evolution. In the early twentieth century, physics underwent a second revolution in quantum mechanics and relativity theory that was also based on increasingly precise and sophisticated observations of physical phenomena. More »
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    The Long Learning Curve Paid Member

                        Sugata: I would like to ask you about the Heart Sutra—the topic of this weekend's workshop. Why did you choose it? Baker Roshi: I didn't. Actually, I had some reservations about it, but Martin Kremer, who organized the seminar, kept asking me to speak on it. Sugata: What were your reservations? Baker Roshi: Although the Heart Sutra is the most commonly chanted Buddhist sutra in the world, it is a deep, difficult teaching. Hard to approach on a weekend, especially when some people are new to Buddhism. Sugata: What is so special about the Heart Sutra? More »
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    Finnegan At His Wake Paid Member

    The guru was dead. His body had just been cremated, lain in state, preserved by salts, for fifty days. His disciples were sitting in rows in the orange-pillared shrine hall that he had designed, with its blue and gilt trim and polished hardwood floor. His throne still rested on its vividly painted dais, the seat now occupied by a photograph of the youthful guru wearing a gold-brocade robe. "When the guru dies," he had once said, "there is still some warmth left behind." More »
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    Life On The Hospice Ward Paid Member

    I'M A NEW hospice volunteer and walk up and down the ward between the two rows of beds with their pale blue sheers 2nd blankets and blue-green curtains that blend with the pale blue-green walls, which echo the green of the garden and the trees outside the windows. The hospice ward is minty, fresh, and light. Smokey, one of the resident cats, finds an empty bed and curls up on it. "Got a minute?" asks… More »
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    There is sex and then there is sexuality. Paid Member

    SEVERAL YEARS AGO I found myself wondering just why the arena of sex was so important, not only to me but to just about everyone I knew. Why is this basic and universal drive the source of so much drama? Why is sex so difficult to talk about? And more to the point, why did I still find it so difficult to talk about? When I looked at sex in my life, I saw a… More »