feature

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Heartbeat Sutra Paid Member

    The first time I talked with “Dr. Chaos” about Buddhism was one twilit night a couple of years ago in a California January. We were sitting on the deck of a friend’s house in Big Sur, two hundred feet above the Pacific. It’s a place where you can both hear and see the waves break. As we listened and watched, the water stretching out like a vast mirror to the horizon, there, in glorious magenta light, the winter sun slowly set: metallic, then amber, then scarlet—one of those natural scenes so far beyond the viewer, so much grander and deeper, that a kind of vertigo swept over us. “You know, I have never watched a sunset before in my life, not to that final moment,” said Dr. Chaos as the darkness rose up out of the ocean and covered us. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Transmuting Blood and Guts: My Experiences in the Buddhist Military Paid Member

    It was an unanticipated homecoming for me, addressing a West Point audience on military matters a few years ago. My original connection to the United States Military Academy runs through my great-grandfather, class of ’77, who’d gone on to win the Congressional Medal of Honor for action against a Native American uprising in the Southwest. His son, my grandfather, graduated from the Academy in 1907; his only son, my uncle, went from Harvard to military intelligence in Korea, and from there to the CIA. But I became Buddhist soon after leaving high school, and I graduated from college as a conscientious objector, refusing the draft because of religious opposition to war of any kind. Yet, paradoxically, it was Buddhism that brought me back to West Point. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    What Are You Really Afraid Of? Paid Member

    For the most part, we experience ourselves as stable and persistent beings, apparently immortal; yet there is also a sneaking awareness of our impermanence, the fact that “I” am growing older and will die. The tension between these two conflicting perceptions is essentially the same one Shakyamuni Buddha himself felt when, as the myth has it, he ventured out of his father’s palace to encounter for the first time an ill man, an aged man, and finally, a corpse. While most traditional religions resolve this tension by claiming that the soul is immortal, Buddhism does the opposite. Not only does it accept our mortality in the usual sense, but it also emphasizes the doctrine of anatta, or “no-self.” More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Shedding Light Paid Member

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Sacred Seeds Paid Member

    Just as a seed contains the whole plant, the syllables of Siddham calligraphy are concentrations of enlightened energy. This holy script played a crucial role in the journey of Tantric Buddhism from ancient India to East Asia. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    My True Home Is Brooklyn Paid Member

    TRACY COCHRAN goes on a Thich Nhat Hanh retreat with her daughter and discovers her very own Zen teacher More »