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  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Zen and the Art Paid Member

    For better or worse, “Zen and the Art of…” has become a phrase that, like “Catch-22,” gets bandied about in all kinds of contexts. Zen and the Art of Changing Diapers, Zen and the Art of Casino Gaming, Zen and the Art of Faking It—there are now literally hundreds of books with “Zen and the Art of…” in the title, all presumably taking their cue from Robert Pirsig’s huge 1970s bestseller, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Likewise, hundreds of articles—even scholarly ones—appear under the same banner: “Zen and the Art of Medical Image Registration,” “Zen and the Art of Policy Analysis,” and so on. More »
  • Tricycle Community 12 comments

    Everyday Meditation Paid Member

    Recently I was thinking about some close friends who are younger than I am, raising families, with busy lives in the world. I could appreciate that it might be quite some time before they would be able to sit a long retreat. So I started wondering if there was a way for people in those circumstances to integrate some kind of meditation technique into their daily activities that could really touch the transformative power of the practice. On longer retreats it’s easier to access meditative depths, but when we’re otherwise intensely engaged, it can be quite a challenge. More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Buddhist to Buddhist Paid Member

    Given the various crises in our world today, the claim made by some that we are in the midst of what in Buddhism is called a “dark age” certainly has some merit. But for those who study and practice the Buddhist teachings, a very different view of our moment in time and the possibilities it affords presents itself. We are, I believe, at the beginning of what could become for Buddhism a new golden age. More »
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    UnStuff Your Life Paid Member

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    Who's Who Paid Member

    Jan Chozen Bays began Zen practice in 1973 under Taizan Maezumi Roshi and has served since 1986 as teacher for the Zen Community of Oregon in Portland and for the residnetial program at Larch Mountain Zen Center. She is also a pediatricican specializing in child abuse.         Jose Cabezon was a monk in the Tibetan tradition for ten years and is currently a professor of Buddhism and Cultural Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is author, editor, and translator of several books, including Buddhism, Sexuality and Gender.           More »