feature

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Buddha Book Paid Member

    Buddha Book presents full-color depictions of the Buddha both East and West, classic and contemporary, with an introduction by Robert A. F. Thurman. Newly released from Chronicle Books, in association with Tricycle, the Buddha Book is an invitation to contemplate the changing face of enlightenment. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Enlightenment Needs a Minyan Paid Member

    I want to explore the possibility, within Buddhism, of enlightenment as a collective as well as an individual process, nurtured by a practice of public truth-telling in a community of spiritual equals. The seeds of this idea are well represented in ancient Buddhist thought and tradition, yet the notion of collaborative awakening connects with many threads of Western tradition, such as democracy, Quaker meeting, trial by jury, even conventional Judeo-Christian worship. It may also help bridge the gap between meditation tradition and the more devotional schools, whose members comprise most of the world's living Buddhists, East and West. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Pentagon Meditation Club Paid Member

    “Here we have the ground zero cafe,” says Bart Ives, gesturing toward a white frame building standing in the open center courtyard of the Pentagon. “It’s a hot dog stand.” Ives, a boyish forty-seven-year-old environmental protection specialist, flashes me a smile that acknowledges the irony of selling wienies right in the heart of the biggest military complex known to humanity. Trying to be polite in spite of being harried, he tells me he doesn’t know when the snack bar picked up the snappy nom de guerre, “but you can be sure it’s still somebody’s ground zero.” More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    ZenX: A Prescription for Despair Paid Member

    This roundtable was conducted in July 1996 by Helen Tworkov in Rochester, New York. The participants, all in their twenties, were residents of the Rochester Zen Center at the time of the conversation. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Tulkus in Training Paid Member

    According to the Tibetan world view, highly evolved adepts are reborn as tulkus—children who embody a developed capacity for spiritual attainment. The search for such a gifted child is based either on the precise instructions left by the deceased, or on the signs inspired by dreams and visions, and from the intuitions of other great lamas. Tulkus are only fully recognized as such at the age of two or three years old. They are commonly enthroned at the age of four or five and usually do not enter a monastery until they are six years old. Each tulku receives a private education by one of two tutors. The child may be brought up with other tulkus but the rules vary according to each monastery. Tulkus, even as children, are given the honorific title of "Rinpoche," which means "precious one." More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Alice in Enlightenedland Paid Member

    Suppose Alice had been reading a book on American Buddhism before drifting off to sleep on that fateful afternoon. Her exchange with the Cheshire Cat might have gone something like this:ALICE CAME TO A FORK in the forest path and was standing for a moment, puzzled as to which way to go, when she spied the Cheshire Cat sitting in full lotus position on a bough of a tree a few yards off, meditating. It looked so peaceful that she dared not disturb it, but at the same time it had such a compassionate air that she felt it might help solve her dilemma. So when it opened its eyes, she cleared her voice and said in her sweetest tone, "If you please, Cheshire-Puss, could you tell me the way to the Queen's croquet game?" For a moment the Cat only grinned at her, with its eyes bulging out quite alarmingly, but then it simply said, "Which would you rather do? Go to the Queen's croquet game, or get enlightened?" More »