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    At the Crossroad Paid Member

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    Many is More Paid Member

    Following the failed coup in Russia a cartoon in a New York newspaper featured two people standing in front of the Kremlin. One was saying to the other, "If you miss the one-party system, go to America." As the cartoon implies, new political alliances threaten to recast the United States as, at best, a beleaguered advocate of ideological plurality. Let's hope that American Buddhism doesn't follow the national political trend, especially since diversity is as central to Buddhist history as it has been to the history of the United States. More »
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    Mountains' Walking Paid Member

    UNLIKE the media staples of sex, money, and power, the more we read about environmentalism, the less inclined we are to read more. And yet, there are the facts. Facts and more facts. One's genuine interest in the work of planetary healing could be killed off by facts alone. So pervasive is this dilemma that it questions the value of information itself. More »
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    Greener Grass Paid Member

    The movies Kundun and Seven Years in Tibet will introduce millions of Westerners to the cultural and religious heritage of Tibet, as well as to the Chinese takeover. Indeed, the hope of both screenwriters Melissa Mathison (p. 65) and Becky Johnston (p. 75) is that their movies will catalyze a grass-roots movement capable of influencing the Clinton administration's policy toward China--specifically, that country's systematic annihilation of its neighbor. More »
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    After Apathy Paid Member

    YOGEN SENZAKl (see "Ancestors"), the first Zen teacher to take up residence in America, taught Zen at a time when there was almost no interest in it. And the challenge of forging a compatible marriage between Asian Buddhism and the Western ideal of social responsibility—the subject of this issue's special section—was not even on the horizon. In his residential hotel rooms in Los Angeles, Senzaki had his American students sit zazen on chairs, for he considered cross-legged meditation a most un-American activity. He died in 1958, just as the currents of Beat Zen were riding the crest into the explosive sixties. More »
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    The Proof is in the Practice Paid Member

    View the print version of this article in PDF format In recent months, proponents of “intelligent design” have enjoyed remarkable success in pitching to American school boards what amounts to nothing less than stealth creationism. By arguing that this essentially religious notion rises to the level of scientific theory, its adherents have created the false impression that scientists themselves are taking part in the debate. They aren't. The only real debate taking place is whether intelligent design should be taught in public schools; scientists, by and large, have long since dismissed the theory's empirical merit. More »