editors pick

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    Ordinary Struggles Paid Member

    Socho Koshin Ogui Sensei is an eighteenth-generation priest in the Jodo Shinshu (True Pure Land) tradition, the most commonly practiced form of Buddhism in Japan. A resident of the United States since 1962, he became minister of the Cleveland Buddhist Temple in 1977 and of the Midwest Buddhist Temple in Chicago in 1992. In 2004, he was appointed Socho (Bishop) of the Buddhist Churches of America and has been instrumental in the ongoing revitalization and� More »
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    Touching Enlightenment With The Body Paid Member

    After years of meditation, you may feel you’re making very little progress. But the guide you may need has been with you all along: your body. Drawing on Tibetan Yogic practices, Reggie Ray takes on the modern crisis of disembodiment. Artwork by Angelo MuscoMore »
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    Tsunami Psychologist Paid Member

    In the aftermath of last year's tsunami, psychologist Ronna Kabatznick struggled to help survivors cope with overwhelming suffering and loss in Thailand.More »
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    HH The Dalai Lama interviewed by Spalding Gray Paid Member

    In an interview with His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama in Tricycle's premier issue, actor and culture critic Spalding Gray set the tone for issues to come with wit, humor, and what a few chagrined American Buddhists considered irreverence. Gray (and Tricycle) brought on the censure of some, but His Holiness didn't seem to mind, and neither did we. The following was adapted from the Fall 1991 issue of Tricycle.More »
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    Paul Ricoeur: In Memoriam Paid Member

    Tricycle remembers philospher Paul Ricoeur with this interview of sociologist Robert Bellah from the Fall 2004 issue.Paul Ricoeur, among the most prominent philosphers of the twentieth century, died last Friday at the age of 92. According to the New York Times, “Dr. Ricoeur's work concerned what he called 'the phenomenon of human life,' and ranged over an almost impossibly vast spectrum of human experience. He wrote on myths and symbols; language and cognition; structuralism and psychoanalysis; religion and aesthetics; ethics and the nature of evil; theories of literature and theories of law. These diverse subjects informed his lifelong study of 'philosophical anthropology,' an exploration of the forces that underpin human action and human suffering.”  More »
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    A Zen for Success Paid Member

    A coversation with Phil Jackson, Zen coaching legend and media darling.More »