dharma talk

  • Tricycle Community 40 comments

    Shopping the Dharma Paid Member

    Consumer culture has spawned a class of spiritual shoppers who bring their acquisitive instincts to the practice of the dharma. When we turn to spirituality, we may think that we’re leaving the corruption of the world behind. But our old ways of thinking do not disappear; they follow us, coloring the way we approach spiritual practice. Since we have all been raised to be good consumers—getting the most while paying the least—as dharma students and teachers we carry our consumer mentality right into our spiritual practice. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    In It Together Paid Member

    I’ve been told—but I don’t know for sure—that you’re like me. If I could speak for you, I would say that you have a deep longing for oneness, a deep urge to return to your original face before your parents were born. The sutra just quoted talks about “the mountains and rivers of the immediate present.” How can you return to the immediate present? These mountains of the immediate present are the self before the emergence of subtle signs. Your existence in the immediate present is the self before the emergence of signs. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Noble Wishes Paid Member

    The Mirror of Essential PointsThe king of perfect dedicationIs the means of increasing the root of virtue.This teaching is the specialty of Shakyamuni,Which is not taught by other teachers.—Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche More »
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    The Bodhisattva Vow: Eight Views Paid Member

    Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama "What do we mean by bodhisattva? Bodhi means enlightenment, the state devoid of all defects and endowed with all good qualities. Sattva refers to someone who has courage and confidence and who strives to attain enlightenment for the sake of all beings. Those who have this spontaneous, sincere wish to attain enlightenment for the ultimate benefit of all beings are called bodhisattvas. Through wisdom, they direct their minds to enlightenment, and through their compassion, they have concern for beings. This wish for perfect enlightenment for the sake of others is what we call bodhichitta, and it is the starting point on the path. By becoming aware of what enlightenment is, one understands not only that there is a goal to accomplish but also that it is possible to do so. Driven by the desire to help beings, one thinks, For their sake, I must attain enlightenment!" More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Triumph of the Heart Paid Member

    Joseph Goldstein teaches that we can improve the way we relate to others - strangers and friends alike. More »
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Pushing the Limits Paid Member

    All phenomena, the Buddha once said, are rooted in desire. Everything we think, say, or do—every experience—comes from desire. Even we come from desire. We were reborn into this life because of our desire to be. Consciously or not, our desires keep redefining our sense of who we are. Desire is how we take our place in the causal matrix of space and time. The only thing not rooted in desire is nirvana, for it’s the end of all phenomena and lies even beyond the Buddha’s use of the word “all.” But the path that takes you to nirvana is rooted in desire—in skillful desires. The path to liberation pushes the limits of skillful desires to see how far they can go. More »