dharma talk

  • Tricycle Community 10 comments

    Our One and Only Commandment Paid Member

    Before the time of Hui-neng, who lived in the seventh century in T’ang China, it was thought that the experience of enlightenment could be attained only after one had practiced and attained some depth in dhyana, meditation. Perhaps some of us still think that. Hui-neng, however, maintained that prajna, transcendental wisdom, is inseparable from dhyana. Neither can be understood without the other. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Dissolving the Confusion Paid Member

    The true, real view is the indivisible unity of emptiness and compassion. Confusion arises when something seemingly is, but actually isn’t, like mistaking a rope for a snake. That is a clear mistake, because in reality the rope is not a snake, no way. How do we actualize this view? We have a lot of thoughts, one after the other, involving the duality of subject and object. When the subject latches onto or grasps the object, that is what is normally called mind, the thinking mind. When there is this subject-object clinging, that creates karma. When karma is created, there is confusion. More »
  • Tricycle Community 23 comments

    Renunciation Paid Member

    When people take refuge in the formal ceremony of becoming a Buddhist, they receive a name that indicates how they should work. I've noticed that when people get the name "Renunciation," they hate it. It makes them feel terrible; they feel as if someone gave them the name "Torture Chamber," or perhaps "Torture Chamber of Enlightenment." People usually don't like the name "Discipline" either, but so much depends on how you look at these things. Renunciation does not have to be regarded as negative. I was taught that it has to do with letting go of holding back. What one is renouncing is closing down and shutting off from life. You could say that renunciation is the same thing as opening to the teachings of the present moment. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    The Heart Sutra Paid Member

    THE GREAT PRAJNA PARAMITA HEART SUTRA Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva doing deep Prajna Paramita Perceived the emptiness of all five conditions, and was freed of pain.O Sariputra, form is no other than emptiness, emptiness no other than form;Form is precisely emptiness, emptiness precisely form;Sensation, perception, reaction and consciousness are also like this.O Sariputra, all things are expressions of emptiness, not born, not destroyed,Not stained, not pure; neither waxing nor waning.Thus emptiness is not form; not sensation nor perception, reaction nor consciousness;No eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, mind;No color, sound, smell, taste, touch, thingNo realm of sight, no realm of consciousnessNo ignorance, no end to ignoranceNo old age and death, no cessation of old age and death More »
  • Tricycle Community 11 comments

    Zen in the Workplace: Approaches to Mindful Management Paid Member

    When the country prospers, the king’s name is unknown. It is only when there are problems that everyone knows who is to blame. It is the person in charge, the ruler: the king, the president, or the manager. When the king is more important than the country, the country will not prosper. When the manager is more important than his or her employees, then the company will fail. If a manager is doing his or her job properly, then the company should run smoothly. The manager will become like a forgotten person, which is what a manager should strive for. Too many managers believe that they must have all of the answers and control every situation. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Dharma Door of Nonduality Paid Member

    THEN, THE LICCHAVI VIMALAKlRTI asked those bodhisattvas, "Good sirs, please explain how the bodhisattvas enter the Dhanna-door of nonduality!" The bodhisattva Dharmavikurvana declared, "Noble sir, 'production' and 'destruction' are two, but what is not produced and does not occur cannot be destroyed. Thus the attainment of the tolerance of the birthlessness of things is the entrance into nonduality." The bodhisattva Srigandha declared, "'I' and 'mine' are two. If there is no presumption of a self, there will be no possessiveness. Thus, the absence of the presumption is the entrance into nonduality." More »