dharma talk

  • Tricycle Community 11 comments

    Undivided Mind Paid Member

    Over the last half-century, Buddhist practices in the West have grown in popularity. Mindfulness has become associated with stress reduction, enhanced immunological protection, psychological well-being, and profound states of happiness. In many cases, mindfulness has been uncoupled from the Buddha’s teaching altogether and is a stand-alone cognitive therapy for the treatment of various mental difficulties, from depression to obsessive-compulsive disorder. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    A Retreat of One’s Own Paid Member

    When she was young, Elizabeth Mattis-Namgyel spent a lot of time pondering where happiness came from. So after she grew up and graduated from World College West, in San Francisco, she journeyed to Nepal to look for a teacher. Shortly after, she went to meet with the great Tibetan master Tulku Urgyen, to seek help with her question. That’s when she met Dzigar Kongtrul, the young lama who would turn out to be her root teacher and her husband. He was twenty-one at the time, she twenty-three. On break at a teaching given by Tulku Urgyen, in October of 1985, he approached her. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Open Stillness Paid Member

    Colorado has a lot of rocks, and people like to climb them. Everywhere you go in Colorado you see people on rocks—big ones. I always wondered how people could climb something so vertical. Then, not long ago, a friend took me climbing for the first time and I found out for myself. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    A More Complete Attention Paid Member

    AdviceA young friend once came to me seeking advice. He had been to India, where he met a guru who had become very important to him. Now my young friend wanted to bring his father to that crowded, hot city, halfway around the world, to meet the guru. I thought about it for a moment, and then said to him, “You know, I don’t think it’s a very good idea. That particular city in India is very unpleasant. The food will be foreign, he may well get sick, and there will be annoying bugs. Besides, I myself found the scene around the guru kind of strange, and your father might well be repulsed by it. He may then dismiss all spiritual endeavor, which would be a terrible outcome. My suggestion is, don’t do it.” More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Mindfulness and Concentration Paid Member

    20 Years, 20 Teachings: The Tricycle 20th Anniversary E-Book. It's free to all Supporting and Sustaining Members. Get the e-book.                         More »
  • Tricycle Community 18 comments

    A Glob of Tar Paid Member

    EVEN THOUGH WE PRACTICE, we continue to fall for pleasant feelings. Feelings are illusory on many levels. We don't realize that they're changeable and unreliable. Instead of offering pleasure, they offer us nothing but stress—yet we're still addicted to them. This business of feeling is a very subtle matter. Please try to contemplate it carefully, this latching onto feelings of pleasure, pain, or equanimity. And you have to experiment with pain more than you may want to. When there are feelings of physical pain or mental distress, the mind will struggle because it doesn't like pain. But when pain turns to pleasure the mind likes it and is content with it. So it keeps on playing with feeling even though, as we've already said, feeling is inconstant, stressful, and not really ours. But the mind doesn't see this. More »