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    Contributors Winter 2006 Paid Member

    CYNTHIA THATCHER describes her motivation for writing about the present moment in this issue's Dharma Talk ("What's So Great about Now?"): "It seems to me that the aim of mindfulness practice is sometimes misunderstood. Many of us expect a heightened sense of beauty or joy in daily life. But when we actually keep our attention in the present, is each moment innately radiant or quite the opposite? Traditionally, the purpose of insight meditation is to see the true nature of mind and body, which doesn't lead to a joyful feeling. Then why should we stay in the now? The article explores that question." More »
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    Contributors Fall 2003 Paid Member

    Dana Sawyer writes on author Aldous Huxley’s Buddhist proclivities in “Aldous Huxley’s Truth Beyond Tradition”. Sawyer tells us: “I first became interested in Buddhism and Hinduism in 1969, after a philosophy professor recommended that I read Huxley’s The Perennial Philosophy. Recently, while writing a spiritual biography of Huxley, I was struck by how much of his particular approach to these religions has stayed with me over the years—even after seven years as a grad student in Asian religions and fifteen years of teaching. Specifically, his warnings against the spiritual materialism caused by confusing the path for the goal seem relevant and insightful to me. More »
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    Contributors Summer 2002 Paid Member

    “I don't subscribe to the sentimental belief that 'children are little Zen masters,’” says Contributing Editor Clark Strand, who wrote this issue’s “On Parenting” column, “but I will concede that they often speak the truth. In that respect they may be superior to the Buddhist teachers who tell us we can become enlightened by following a monastic-style meditation program, all the while trying to raise families and hold down a job.” Strand is a former Zen monk and founder of the Koans of the Bible Study Group in Woodstock, New York, where he lives with his wife and two children. More »
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    Contributors Fall 2001 Paid Member

    Noelle Oxenhandler, who wonders just when and how her practice path opened up, tells us: “For me, writing this essay was like that wonderful children’s story Harold and the Purple Crayon. It was as though I discovered the purple crayon with which I could draw my way out of a painfully confining place. It was frightening at first; I almost said 'No’ when the editors asked me to write it. What if I couldn’t find the window? Now I’m grateful to have been handed the purple crayon.” More »
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    Contributors Paid Member

    Charles Johnson won the 1990 National Book Award for his novel Middle Passage. He has written three other novels, a collection of short stories, numerous critical books and reviews, and is a published cartoonist. His next book, King: The Photobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. (Viking Studio, 2000) will be published in November. A student of the Dalai Lama, Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron ordained as a Buddhist nun in 1977. A passionate advocate for political commitment, she teaches at Dharma Friendship Foundation in Seattle, Washington. Her most recent book is the newly released Blossoms of the Dharma: Living as a Buddhist Nun (North Atlantic Books, 1999). More »
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    Contributors Winter 2004 Paid Member

    Andrew Schelling (“Rucksack Poetry,”) tells us: “As a poet who is continually indebted to Asia, I’ve been a longtime watcher and writer of haiku. Surely the most recognizable form of poetry on our continent, haiku also seems the most Zen of art forms. Is it a form of poetry or a state of mind? I think a bit of both. As I started to track its arrival here, Haiku America emerged as a personality, a character full of painful karma and complex beauties. In fifty years it’s become native—wise and tricky—a raven, a jackrabbit, or a coyote on the median strip of the highway.” More »