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    Contributors Fall 2001 Paid Member

    Noelle Oxenhandler, who wonders just when and how her practice path opened up, tells us: “For me, writing this essay was like that wonderful children’s story Harold and the Purple Crayon. It was as though I discovered the purple crayon with which I could draw my way out of a painfully confining place. It was frightening at first; I almost said 'No’ when the editors asked me to write it. What if I couldn’t find the window? Now I’m grateful to have been handed the purple crayon.” More »
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    Charles Johnson won the 1990 National Book Award for his novel Middle Passage. He has written three other novels, a collection of short stories, numerous critical books and reviews, and is a published cartoonist. His next book, King: The Photobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. (Viking Studio, 2000) will be published in November. More »
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    Contributors Winter 2004 Paid Member

    Andrew Schelling (“Rucksack Poetry,”) tells us: “As a poet who is continually indebted to Asia, I’ve been a longtime watcher and writer of haiku. Surely the most recognizable form of poetry on our continent, haiku also seems the most Zen of art forms. Is it a form of poetry or a state of mind? I think a bit of both. As I started to track its arrival here, Haiku America emerged as a personality, a character full of painful karma and complex beauties. In fifty years it’s become native—wise and tricky—a raven, a jackrabbit, or a coyote on the median strip of the highway.” More »
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    Contributors Fall 2004 Paid Member

    Amy Schmidt’s article on practicing with trauma, coauthored with Dr. John J. Miller, appears here. She tells us, “Like many trauma survivors, I spent lots of time believing that I was a hopeless yogi because I couldn’t get beyond the emotional turmoil. When I became the resident teacher at Insight Meditation Society, I was able to see behind the scenes of retreats, and I realized there were others working with trauma in their meditation practice. We wrote this article so that meditators with trauma histories can realize they aren’t alone. Also, I believe such meditators have special needs in terms of practices, and I feel it’s important that students and teachers alike are aware of these needs.” More »
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    Contributors Summer 2004 Paid Member

    Tricycle editor-at-large Joan Duncan Oliver mined her own compulsions for “Drink and a Man” (page 67), a first-person essay in the special section “The Riddle of Desire.” “I wish I’d read Mu Soeng’s new book, Trust in Mind, before I sat down to write,” she says, referring to the Buddhist scholar’s latest title (review in this issue). More »
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    Contributors Spring 2003 Paid Member

    Andrew Cooper [“Modernity’s God-shaped Hole,”] reflects: “Knocking around among various Buddhist schools, I was struck by how each particular story of the path seems to elicit congruent experiences. In other words, Zen folks have Zen experiences, Vajrayanists have Vajrayana experiences. Entering this process entails faith - that is, one allows oneself to be seized by the story. Today, traditional religious narratives bump up against each other, and against competing narratives from the secular world, with a force and frequency that is altogether new. So the religious question of our historical moment, it seems to me, is not what faith one holds but how one holds one’s faith.” More »