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    Contributors Spring 2007 Paid Member

    Pankaj Mishra, whose essay "The Disappearance of the Spiritual Thinker" appears in this issue, tells us, "I grew up in India reading Western literature and philosophy, and nothing seemed to me to be more attractive than the life of the intellectual. I have lost that reverence and now wonder how intellectuals could have lent their services to violent ideological ventures. More »
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    Contributors Summer 2007 Paid Member

    PAGAN KENNEDY, whose article "Man-Made Monk" is in this issue, tells us : "Three years ago, I learned that a British aristocrat named Laura Dillon, who become Michael Dillon in 1943, was the first to undergo a female-to-male sex change. After he'd refashioned his body, Michael Dillon fled the West for India, where he became one of the first Westerners to practice Buddhism according to Tibetan traditions. My book The First Man-Made Man (Bloomsbury) tells about Dillon's adventures on the path to authenticity. ‘The conquest of the body proved relatively easy,' Dillon observed at the end of this life. ‘But the conquest of the mind is a never-ending struggle.'" More »
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    Contributors Winter 2006 Paid Member

    CYNTHIA THATCHER describes her motivation for writing about the present moment in this issue's Dharma Talk ("What's So Great about Now?"): "It seems to me that the aim of mindfulness practice is sometimes misunderstood. Many of us expect a heightened sense of beauty or joy in daily life. But when we actually keep our attention in the present, is each moment innately radiant or quite the opposite? Traditionally, the purpose of insight meditation is to see the true nature of mind and body, which doesn't lead to a joyful feeling. Then why should we stay in the now? The article explores that question." More »
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    Contributors Fall 2003 Paid Member

    Dana Sawyer writes on author Aldous Huxley’s Buddhist proclivities in “Aldous Huxley’s Truth Beyond Tradition”. Sawyer tells us: “I first became interested in Buddhism and Hinduism in 1969, after a philosophy professor recommended that I read Huxley’s The Perennial Philosophy. Recently, while writing a spiritual biography of Huxley, I was struck by how much of his particular approach to these religions has stayed with me over the years—even after seven years as a grad student in Asian religions and fifteen years of teaching. Specifically, his warnings against the spiritual materialism caused by confusing the path for the goal seem relevant and insightful to me. More »
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    Contributors Summer 2002 Paid Member

    “I don't subscribe to the sentimental belief that 'children are little Zen masters,’” says Contributing Editor Clark Strand, who wrote this issue’s “On Parenting” column, “but I will concede that they often speak the truth. In that respect they may be superior to the Buddhist teachers who tell us we can become enlightened by following a monastic-style meditation program, all the while trying to raise families and hold down a job.” Strand is a former Zen monk and founder of the Koans of the Bible Study Group in Woodstock, New York, where he lives with his wife and two children. More »
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    Contributors Fall 2001 Paid Member

    Noelle Oxenhandler, who wonders just when and how her practice path opened up, tells us: “For me, writing this essay was like that wonderful children’s story Harold and the Purple Crayon. It was as though I discovered the purple crayon with which I could draw my way out of a painfully confining place. It was frightening at first; I almost said 'No’ when the editors asked me to write it. What if I couldn’t find the window? Now I’m grateful to have been handed the purple crayon.” More »