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    Contributors Fall 2006 Paid Member

    CLARK STRAND’s confession of faith, “Born Again Buddhist”, offers a highly personal view of American Buddhism. He tells us: “I believe we are on the brink of a great new wave of Buddhist conversion, and that wave will be Pure Land Buddhism. The Pure Land teaching seizes ordinary people in the midst of their ordinary lives and transforms them on the spot. And because that experience is passed from heart to heart, it travels very quickly. That is why I have called it born-again Buddhism. It will spread exactly like a fire.” More »
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    Contributors Spring 2004 Paid Member

    Harvard psychologist Jack Engler reflects on his study of Buddhist practice in the special section “Enlightenment in this Lifetime”. He says, “Though I’ve written a lot about practice, and about Buddhist and Western psychology, I’ve never published the personal interviews from doctoral research I did many years ago with enlightened Vipassana practitioners in India, including my two main teachers, Dipa Ma and Anagarika Munindraji. Munindraji’s recent passing has lent poignancy to publishing this interview with Dipa Ma. He was her teacher long before he was mine, and she was by far his most adept student. It seems fitting to remember them together.” More »
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    Contributors - Summer 2008 Paid Member

    TSULTRIM ALLIONE has been inspired by the teachings of the 11th-century female Tibetan teacher Machig Labdrön since the early seventies, when she was living as a Tibetan Buddhist nun in India. Her new book—Feeding Your Demons: Ancient Wisdom for Resolving Inner Conflict, from which her article “Feeding Your Demons” has been adapted—presents Machig’s teachings in a form accessible to Westerners. Allione says, “Machig presented a method that was quite extraordinary: feeding the enemy instead of attacking it.” More »
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    Contributors Spring 2007 Paid Member

    Pankaj Mishra, whose essay "The Disappearance of the Spiritual Thinker" appears in this issue, tells us, "I grew up in India reading Western literature and philosophy, and nothing seemed to me to be more attractive than the life of the intellectual. I have lost that reverence and now wonder how intellectuals could have lent their services to violent ideological ventures. More »
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    Contributors Summer 2007 Paid Member

    PAGAN KENNEDY, whose article "Man-Made Monk" is in this issue, tells us : "Three years ago, I learned that a British aristocrat named Laura Dillon, who become Michael Dillon in 1943, was the first to undergo a female-to-male sex change. After he'd refashioned his body, Michael Dillon fled the West for India, where he became one of the first Westerners to practice Buddhism according to Tibetan traditions. My book The First Man-Made Man (Bloomsbury) tells about Dillon's adventures on the path to authenticity. ‘The conquest of the body proved relatively easy,' Dillon observed at the end of this life. ‘But the conquest of the mind is a never-ending struggle.'" More »
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    Contributors Winter 2006 Paid Member

    CYNTHIA THATCHER describes her motivation for writing about the present moment in this issue's Dharma Talk ("What's So Great about Now?"): "It seems to me that the aim of mindfulness practice is sometimes misunderstood. Many of us expect a heightened sense of beauty or joy in daily life. But when we actually keep our attention in the present, is each moment innately radiant or quite the opposite? Traditionally, the purpose of insight meditation is to see the true nature of mind and body, which doesn't lead to a joyful feeling. Then why should we stay in the now? The article explores that question." More »