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    Contributors Spring 2004 Paid Member

    Harvard psychologist Jack Engler reflects on his study of Buddhist practice in the special section “Enlightenment in this Lifetime”. He says, “Though I’ve written a lot about practice, and about Buddhist and Western psychology, I’ve never published the personal interviews from doctoral research I did many years ago with enlightened Vipassana practitioners in India, including my two main teachers, Dipa Ma and Anagarika Munindraji. Munindraji’s recent passing has lent poignancy to publishing this interview with Dipa Ma. He was her teacher long before he was mine, and she was by far his most adept student. It seems fitting to remember them together.” More »
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    Contributors Spring 2002 Paid Member

    Soko Morinaga Roshi, (“Dharma Talk”) was ordained as a Zen monk in Japan in 1948 and trained in the monastery at Daitokuji, eventually receiving the seal of dharma transmission from Sesso Ota Roshi. He died in 1995. An excerpt from the forthcoming English translation of his book, From Novice to Master, appears in this issue of Tricycle. Translator Belenda Yamakawa remarks: “I think parts of Morinaga’s book will be inspiring for people who are already practicing. But I also see it as a great introductory book - a “why practice” for people who are open but still need an explanation deeply rooted in experience and which still soundly appeals to reason!”More »
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    Contributors Summer 2003 Paid Member

    David R. Loy [“What Are You Really Afraid Of?” and “Why We Love War”] reflects on the interface between traditional Buddhist teachings and contemporary issues: “Buddhist insights must inform, and be informed by, what the modern social sciences have discovered about human motivation and interaction. That dialogue is still in its infancy, but it is essential to clarify what Buddhism has to offer at this crucial moment in history. I believe that Buddhism today shouldn’t focus only on personal transformation. Buddhist teachings also have important implications for the way we understand institutions. The world needs its insights, but in a modern vocabulary.” More »
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    Contributors - Summer 2008 Paid Member

    TSULTRIM ALLIONE has been inspired by the teachings of the 11th-century female Tibetan teacher Machig Labdrön since the early seventies, when she was living as a Tibetan Buddhist nun in India. Her new book—Feeding Your Demons: Ancient Wisdom for Resolving Inner Conflict, from which her article “Feeding Your Demons” has been adapted—presents Machig’s teachings in a form accessible to Westerners. Allione says, “Machig presented a method that was quite extraordinary: feeding the enemy instead of attacking it.” More »
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    Contributors Spring 2007 Paid Member

    Pankaj Mishra, whose essay "The Disappearance of the Spiritual Thinker" appears in this issue, tells us, "I grew up in India reading Western literature and philosophy, and nothing seemed to me to be more attractive than the life of the intellectual. I have lost that reverence and now wonder how intellectuals could have lent their services to violent ideological ventures. More »
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    Contributors Summer 2007 Paid Member

    PAGAN KENNEDY, whose article "Man-Made Monk" is in this issue, tells us : "Three years ago, I learned that a British aristocrat named Laura Dillon, who become Michael Dillon in 1943, was the first to undergo a female-to-male sex change. After he'd refashioned his body, Michael Dillon fled the West for India, where he became one of the first Westerners to practice Buddhism according to Tibetan traditions. My book The First Man-Made Man (Bloomsbury) tells about Dillon's adventures on the path to authenticity. ‘The conquest of the body proved relatively easy,' Dillon observed at the end of this life. ‘But the conquest of the mind is a never-ending struggle.'" More »