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    Contributors Fall 2008 Paid Member

    MARTINE BATCHELOR’s article “What Is This?” describes the Korean Zen practice of questioning, exploring how to apply the traditional koan to contemporary habits of mind. She says, “Questioning gives you energy because there is no place for the mind to rest. It allows for more possibilities and less certainty. If you meditate in this way, your mind will become more flexible, and you will start to see that you have more choices in your actions and behavior than you thought possible.” For some time, Martine has been interested in the limiting effects of habits and how meditation can help us to dissolve them creatively. Her most recent book is Let Go: A Buddhist Guide to Breaking Free of Habits. More »
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    Contributors Spring 2008 Paid Member

    Joan Halifax, Zen teacher and Abbot of Upaya Zen Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico, brought her experience as a pioneer in end-of-life field care to this issue's "The Lucky Dark." She says, "My work with dying people reminds me of Zen Master Keizan's words, means not finding fault with the present moment.'" Her new book, Being with Dying: Cultivating Compassion and Fearlessness in the Presence of Death (Shambhala), will be available in June 2008. More »
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    Contributors Fall 2002 Paid Member

    Donald Lopez is Carl W. Belser Professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies at the University of Michigan. Author or editor of some twenty books, including Curators of the Buddha: The Study of Buddhism Under Colonialism and Prisoners of Shangri-La: Tibetan Buddhism and the West, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000. More »
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    Contributors Winter 2002 Paid Member

    Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D., is a meditation teacher, writer, and scientist. He recently retired from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, where he was founding executive director of the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society; founder and former director of its world-renowned Stress Reduction Clinic; and a professor of medicine. An early student of Korean Zen master Seung Sahn, he was a founder of the Cambridge Zen Center. Author of Full Catastrophe Living and Wherever You Go, There You Are, Dr. Kabat-Zinn is at work on a new book, Coming to Our Senses: Mindfulness, Dharma, and Living Life As If It Mattered, to be published by Hyperion in 2004. An interview with Dr. Kabat-Zinn about pain management appears here. More »
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    Contributors Summer 2006 Paid Member

    Eliot Fintushel profiles Dr. Manfred Clynes for this issue in “The Merry Greis”. He writes: “Soldiering away at profitless things—that’s the life of the artist. Squint and tickle—maybe it’s something, and maybe it’s nothing—it hardly matters. The valuation is just a burden to be endured, plus or minus. So, now and then, when you meet a fellow from whose labors has issued, as it happens, something big and remarkable—you want to celebrate it.” More »
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    Contributors Fall 2006 Paid Member

    CLARK STRAND’s confession of faith, “Born Again Buddhist”, offers a highly personal view of American Buddhism. He tells us: “I believe we are on the brink of a great new wave of Buddhist conversion, and that wave will be Pure Land Buddhism. The Pure Land teaching seizes ordinary people in the midst of their ordinary lives and transforms them on the spot. And because that experience is passed from heart to heart, it travels very quickly. That is why I have called it born-again Buddhism. It will spread exactly like a fire.” More »