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    Contributors Fall 2008 Paid Member

    MARTINE BATCHELOR’s article “What Is This?” describes the Korean Zen practice of questioning, exploring how to apply the traditional koan to contemporary habits of mind. She says, “Questioning gives you energy because there is no place for the mind to rest. It allows for more possibilities and less certainty. If you meditate in this way, your mind will become more flexible, and you will start to see that you have more choices in your actions and behavior than you thought possible.” For some time, Martine has been interested in the limiting effects of habits and how meditation can help us to dissolve them creatively. Her most recent book is Let Go: A Buddhist Guide to Breaking Free of Habits. More »
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    Contributors Spring 2008 Paid Member

    Joan Halifax, Zen teacher and Abbot of Upaya Zen Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico, brought her experience as a pioneer in end-of-life field care to this issue's "The Lucky Dark." She says, "My work with dying people reminds me of Zen Master Keizan's words, means not finding fault with the present moment.'" Her new book, Being with Dying: Cultivating Compassion and Fearlessness in the Presence of Death (Shambhala), will be available in June 2008. More »
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    Contributors Summer 2006 Paid Member

    Eliot Fintushel profiles Dr. Manfred Clynes for this issue in “The Merry Greis”. He writes: “Soldiering away at profitless things—that’s the life of the artist. Squint and tickle—maybe it’s something, and maybe it’s nothing—it hardly matters. The valuation is just a burden to be endured, plus or minus. So, now and then, when you meet a fellow from whose labors has issued, as it happens, something big and remarkable—you want to celebrate it.” More »
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    Contributors Fall 2006 Paid Member

    CLARK STRAND’s confession of faith, “Born Again Buddhist”, offers a highly personal view of American Buddhism. He tells us: “I believe we are on the brink of a great new wave of Buddhist conversion, and that wave will be Pure Land Buddhism. The Pure Land teaching seizes ordinary people in the midst of their ordinary lives and transforms them on the spot. And because that experience is passed from heart to heart, it travels very quickly. That is why I have called it born-again Buddhism. It will spread exactly like a fire.” More »
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    Contributors Spring 2004 Paid Member

    Harvard psychologist Jack Engler reflects on his study of Buddhist practice in the special section “Enlightenment in this Lifetime”. He says, “Though I’ve written a lot about practice, and about Buddhist and Western psychology, I’ve never published the personal interviews from doctoral research I did many years ago with enlightened Vipassana practitioners in India, including my two main teachers, Dipa Ma and Anagarika Munindraji. Munindraji’s recent passing has lent poignancy to publishing this interview with Dipa Ma. He was her teacher long before he was mine, and she was by far his most adept student. It seems fitting to remember them together.” More »
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    Contributors Spring 2002 Paid Member

    Soko Morinaga Roshi, (“Dharma Talk”) was ordained as a Zen monk in Japan in 1948 and trained in the monastery at Daitokuji, eventually receiving the seal of dharma transmission from Sesso Ota Roshi. He died in 1995. An excerpt from the forthcoming English translation of his book, From Novice to Master, appears in this issue of Tricycle. Translator Belenda Yamakawa remarks: “I think parts of Morinaga’s book will be inspiring for people who are already practicing. But I also see it as a great introductory book - a “why practice” for people who are open but still need an explanation deeply rooted in experience and which still soundly appeals to reason!”More »