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    Selected Contributors Winter 2010 Paid Member

    Misha Gordin, the award-winning photographer (here), set out to be an aviation engineer. But after technical college in his native Latvia, he joined the special effects department of Riga Motion Picture studios instead. At 19, he took up photography, shooting portraits and documentary stills. He soon found those forms unsatisfactory, however, and put aside his camera to concentrate on Russian literature and cinematography. (He counts Dostoevsky among his major influences.) Always searching “for a way to express my personal feelings and thoughts using photography,” in 1972 he hit on a vehicle: capturing ideas rather than literal moments on film. Turning the camera inward, on his “soul,” Gordin produced his first conceptual photograph, Confession. More »
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    Selected Contributors Fall 2010 Paid Member

    Kazuaki Tanahashi, born in Japan in 1933 and working in the United States since 1977, is an artist, writer, worker for peace and an environmental advocate. Kaz’s one-stroke paintings, multicolor Zen circles, and calligraphy have appeared in solo exhibitions throughout the world. His publications include Brush Mind, Penetrating Laughter: Hakuin’s Zen and Art; and Lotus. Since 1960 he has dedicated much of his life to translating Zen master Eihei Dogen’s writings, in such books as Moon in a Dewdrop, Enlightenment Unfolds, and The True Dharma Eye: Zen Master Dogen’s Three Hundred Koans. He is a Fellow of the World Academy of Art and Science and founding director of A World without Armies. More »
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    Contributors Fall 2007 Paid Member

    Novelist Bruce Wagner’s essay on the influential author and spiritual guide Carlos Castaneda, “The Art of Reality,” appears in this issue. “When the opportunity unexpectedly presented itself to contribute something to Tricycle, the notion of writing about Carlos Castaneda immediately came to mind. At first, the writing was stiffly formal; when I attempted something more personal, it seemed like a much better approach. A great teacher of any tradition can introduce one to the concepts of intent, self-examination, personal accountability, the Spirit, the Wheel of Time, the Wheel of Karma—though usually the student is ‘asleep at the Wheel,’ and such concepts become mere sloganeering. We remain trapped in adolescence. More »
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    Contributors Winter 2007 Paid Member

    RJ ESKOW was drawn into the fractious world of blogging after the 2004 presidential election. He recounts some of his escapades on the political front in “Above the Fray.” “The burnout rate for politically involved people in this country is overwhelming,” he tells us. “It took out an entire generation in the sixties. Now the powerful are engaging in a verbal war of attrition against anyone who disagrees with them. Keeping up your spirits—in both the literal and deeper senses—can be difficult. People are often drawn into a conflict between being ‘nice’ and being effective. That’s tough for some of us—but then, they’re counting on that to take us out of the struggle. And a lot of the time, it does.” More »
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    Contributors Winter 2003 Paid Member

    A veteran environmental journalist, Lisa Jones knew about Michael Soulé the "father of conservation biology" long before she knew about Michael Soulé the Buddhist ("The Buckshot Bodhisattva"). But now Jones and Soulé are both members of the same sangha in tiny Paonia, Colorado, where Jones buys the meat she eats from local ranchers, and Soulé retreats into the hills to hunt game for himself—and in his view, to restore ecological balance. "There's nothing pious or politically correct about Michael," Jones says; "he applies the same kind of boundary-busting thinking to his spiritual practice that he applies to science and environmental activism." More »