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    The Voices of the Watershed Paid Member

    In an excerpt from her new book, Gardening at the Dragon’s Gate, Wendy Johnson recalls a personal pilgrimage across the mountains of Northern California. More »
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    Unreal Imagination Exists Paid Member

    Understanding the Buddha’s paradoxical view of reality More »
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    What Does Being a Buddhist Mean to You? Paid Member

    Jakusho Kwong RoshiAbbotThe Sonoma Mountain Zen CenterSanta Rosa, California “A moment of silence in the schools is a good start—a good start for teachers, too. Just sitting up straight in a relaxed way for a moment helps us regain our natural composure and sense of dignity. It is like an exploration for teachers as well as students, exploring a gigantic area. Because something is needed. This is a stepping-stone—returning to silence.” Reverend Masao Kakuryo KodaniPriestSenshin Buddhist TempleLos Angeles, California More »
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    ON GARDENING: The Birds of the Muses Paid Member

    THE BEES were living in the walls long before I heard them. It was Indian summer a few years ago when I discovered a small cleft along the seamline where our brick chimney pressed against the outer wall of the house. High overhead, scores of pollen-laden honeybees whizzed with industrious delight through this narrow fissure into the inner core of our home. As a meditator and gardener I have an immense respect for bees, grounded� More »
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    THUS HAVE I HEARD: A Universal Formula Paid Member

    ONE OF THE SIMPLEST yet most profound things attributed to the Buddha in the Pali canon is the general statement of interdependent origination: When there is this, there is that, When there is not this, there is not that. When this arises, that arises. When this ceases, that ceases. More »
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    ON LANGUAGE: The Dharma of Deconstruction Paid Member

    View the print version of this article in PDF format THE FUNDAMENTAL INSIGHT of what is known as the “linguistic turn” in twentieth-century Western thought is that language shapes our experience. Some of the most influential modern thinkers challenge our usual assumption that using language is merely a matter of attaching names to things that already exist in the world. In a very important sense, language creates the world as we know it. More »