brief teachings

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    The Chaos Under the Hood Paid Member

    Chaos is the mind of the self, of selfing, of unconscious habit patterns run wild. The mind of chaos is what is referred to in Buddhism as dukkha, or suffering. It is a chronically stressed mind, a mind of taking everything personally, of constant reactivity both gross and subtle. Such a mind is the consequence of delusion, of believing that the self exists in the ways we both conceive of it and perceive it. With such a mind, we’re confined to experience within the fractured, chaotic state we create with labeling, separating, judging, resisting, and clinging. More »
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    The Single Thing Paid Member

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    What to Do When the Anger Gets Hot Paid Member

    Americans think it is beneficial to “get in touch with” their anger. That’s just the first step—recognizing your anger. The second step is analyzing and meditating on your anger. The tradition to which I belong [Gelugpa] teaches that analytical meditation must be combined with concentration meditation. So analyzing your thoughts, your ideas, your emotions, is absolutely important. With this you recognize what is really hatred, what is really anger. You’re going deeper and recognizing that “I am angry, I am hating.” More »
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    A Full Load of Moonlight Paid Member

    Ten Stanzas Written on Cloud-Shrouded Terrace (No. 6) Sitting upright at the foot of clouds, too lazy to lift my head,I have no more dharma words for the Chan practitioners.Everything under the sun makes plain the Path—might as well hang my mouth on the wall and shut up. —Huaishen (1077–1132) I’m Happy with My Way of Life More »
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    Every Revolution Needs Fresh Poems Paid Member

    Every revolution needs fresh poemsthat is the reasonpoetry cannot die.It is the reason poetsgo without sleepand sometimes without loverswithout new carsand without fine clothesthe reason we committo facing the darkandresign ourselves, regularly, to the possibilityof being wrong.Poetry is leading us.It never cares how we willbe held by loversor drive fastor look goodin the moment;but about how completelywe are committedto movementboth inner and outer;and devoted to transformationand to change. From The World Will Follow Joy: Turning Madness into Flowers, by Alice Walker © 2014 The New Press. Reprinted with permission of the publisher. More »
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    The Sweet Pain of Remorse Paid Member

    One particular difficulty, which is one of the most effective catalysts to awakening the heart, is experiencing the pain of remorse. Sometimes we get a glimpse of the fact that we’re living from vanity or unkindness or pettiness, and we feel a cringe of conscience. This is the experience of remorse, which arises when we become acutely aware that we are going against our true nature—against the heart that seeks to awaken. We can feel the pain we cause others, as well as ourselves; and this experience is almost always sobering. In fact, perhaps as much as anything, the pain of remorse can motivate a profound desire within us to live more awake and more genuinely. From the pain of deep humiliation—from seeing how we go against our true nature—real humility can awaken. . . . More »