books

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    Books In Brief Paid Member

    ZEN WORD, ZEN CALLIGRAPHY Text by Eido Tai Shimano Calligraphy by Kogetsu Tani Shambhala Publications: Boston, 1992. 160 pp., $50.00 (clothbound).   THE ZENGO OR ZEN WORDS and phrases in Kogetsu Tani's calligraphy cut right to the heart of dharma. Brief texts by Eido Tai Shimano frame the calligraphy by introducing the word or phrase in English and providing essential commentary on the tradition. At least since the T'ang dynasty, Ch'an and Zen masters have used the calligraphic scroll as a pointer or a reminder, an agent to provoke thought and preparation for zazen, not as a substitute for daily practice. But how can calligraphy and short commentary achieve fuden no den, that is, how can it "transmit the intransmittable" dharma? More »
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    Buddhist Books - Ancient Texts, New Voices, Younger Faces Paid Member

    Dharma for dabblers, practitioners, and the new generation More »
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    Buddhist Books - Ancient Texts, New Voices, Younger Faces Paid Member

    Are you casting about for new titles to add to your Buddhist library? Lucky you. The dharma bookshelf has never been better stocked. There’s something for everyone, at every level of interest and commitment, plus a new crop of authors with a fresh perspective. This past June, at Book Expo America, the booksellers’ annual trade show, publishers of Buddhist titles waxed enthusiastic about both the depth and breadth of their lists, from treasure texts to beginners’ meditation kits. “There’s room for it all,” observed Rod Meade Sperry, Wisdom Publications’ marketing director. “We’re publishing more titles than ever, serving academics, practitioners, and dabblers.” More »
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    Philosophy of Nature Paid Member

    Contrary to popular belief, Americans are not materialists, as I have said before. We are not people who love material, and by and large our culture is devoted to the transformation of material into junk as rapidly as possible. God's own junkyard! Therefore, it's a very important lesson for a wealthy nation - and all Americans are colossally wealthy by the standards of the rest of the world - to see what happens to material… More »
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    Philosophy of Nature Paid Member

    Contrary to popular belief, Americans are not materialists, as I have said before. We are not people who love material, and by and large our culture is devoted to the transformation of material into junk as rapidly as possible. God’s own junkyard! Therefore, it’s a very important lesson for a wealthy nation - and all Americans are colossally wealthy by the standards of the rest of the world - to see what happens to material� More »