ancestors

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    Still Speaking Paid Member

    Students of Zen Buddhism come to me with a variety of "first books" in their past and among them, with some frequency, is Dwight Goddard's durable anthology of translations, A Buddhist Bible, originally published in 1932 and then republished in its present, enlarged form in 1938. More »
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    Remembering Alan Watts Paid Member

    The remarkable life of Zen pioneer Alan Watts [1915-1973] is featured in the Fall 2007 issue ("The Sensualist," by Mira Tweti). In this special web exclusive we celebrate the work and legacy of Watts with audio, video, and art by and about Alan Watts. Enjoy!   Alan Watts Theater. Several animated movies from South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone. The image pictured is from an animation by Tim Sisco.   Also, take a look at the Alan Watts Story featuring his TV and autobiographic lecture series.   Excerpt from Eastern Wisdom. Modern Life by Alan Watts, published by New World Library.   More »
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    Lost Stories Paid Member

    My sangha chants a lineage of female ancestors, alternating day by day with our traditional lineage. When we began doing this a few years ago, it was like harvesting fruit from a very old tree. The seeds were planted when Mahapajapati became the first female Buddhist monk and leader of a thriving women’s monastic community in ancient India. From the beginning of my Soto Zen practice, I’ve known both male and female monks, priests and lay students, and have seen men and women holding equal ranks. In my own sangha, men and women serve in varying roles without gender distinction. More »
  • The Religion of Science Paid Member

    The Gospel of Buddha is a relatively small volume of passages culled from the Buddhist canon and arranged, like the biblical gospels, into “chapter and verse.” First published in 1894, by the turn of the century this collection was probably the single most popular Buddhist catechism in the world. By 1915 it was in its thirteenth English edition, with versions having appeared in Japanese, Chinese, German, French, Spanish, Dutch, and Urdu. Its broad acceptance among Asian Buddhist leaders of the time was unprecedented: the Zen Master Shaku Soyen wrote that the Gospel which was then being used as a reader at Tokyo Imperial University, served the needs of Japanese students of Buddhism better than did the Buddhist scriptures themselves. More »
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    Alexandra David-Néel Paid Member