afterword

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    The Spell-Check Sutra Paid Member

    When “Trungpa” comes up “turnip,” and your “sangha” becomes “sangria,” you know you’re in cyberspace. A secular computer spell-check program, when fed Buddhist words, suggested some English alternatives, offered here with dharma definitions of their own. Arhat: Skt., lit. “worthy one”; one in whom all defilements and passions have been extinguished� More »
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    Absolute Relativity Paid Member

    Time and again the passion for understanding has led to the illusion that man is able to comprehend the objective world rationally by pure thought without any empirical foundations—in short, by metaphysics. —Albert Einstein By becoming attached to names and forms, not realizing that they have no more basis than the activities of the mind itself, error arises and the way to emancipation is blocked. —Buddha The external world of physics has thus become a world of shadows. In removing our illusions we have removed the substance, for indeed we have seen that substance is one of the greatest of our illusions. —Sir Arthur Eddington More »
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    The Koans of Yogi Berra Paid Member

    Compiled with commentary by Brad StroupDiscovered inside a catcher’s mitt in the year 2087 by archaeologists while excavating rubble in the abandoned Yankee Stadium in the Bronx:   KOAN 1: “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.”   Commentary: Yogi gave this mystifying advice to a young second baseman being sent down to the minors after popping out too many times with the Yankees. It caused the young man to stop in his tracks, freeze, and study the wall of the Yankee dugout for over an hour. He was last seen in Troy, New York, playing for the Mohawks, still carrying a frown on his face. Hundreds of players have studied this koan as they have gone down to the minors. It sits like a boil on the forearm of pitchers - feverish, festering, a red circle surrounding a yellow mound. Once considered without spit or curves, the mind cannot escape the fork. The dust clears in the outfield. More »
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    The Cloud of God Paid Member

    It's just a little Shinto shrine: a strong woman could pick it up and carry it away. It sits in a niche in a wall on a nondescript corner of an alley in Kyoto that I pass by every morning, in an otherwise soulless neighborhood of the kind often seen around train stations in cities, especially that early in the day: monolithic apartment blocks, closed-up shops, empty streets. But there is always a flower in… More »
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    The Cloud of God Paid Member

    It's just a little Shinto shrine: a strong woman could pick it up and carry it away. It sits in a niche in a wall on a nondescript corner of an alley in Kyoto that I pass by every morning, in an otherwise soulless neighborhood of the kind often seen around train stations in cities, especially that early in the day: monolithic apartment blocks, closed-up shops, empty streets. But there is always a flower in… More »
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    "Nothing Is Final Forever" Paid Member

    This vignette is excerpted from A Journey with Elsa Cloud, just published by Books & Co./Turtle Point Press. The story opens with a telephone call to the narrator from her estranged daughter in India who, having become a Tibetan Buddhist practitioner, lures her mother to the East with the promise of an audience with the Dalai Lama. What follows is a series of adventures and misadventures, in which travels through India weave around spiritual longing, family history, and the poignant dynamic of the mother-daughter relationship. Leila Hadley lives in New York and is a consulting editor to Tricycle. More »