Living in the World

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Found Dharma Talks Paid Member

    POOL HALL DHARMA TALK Aim your stick not the cue ball KRYPTONITE BIKE LOCK DHARMA TALK Do not force key CHELSEA CAR WASH 24-HOUR DHARMA TALK Neutral no brakes no steering DHARMA TALK AT THE CANAL ST. P.O Insert bills straight and carefully Bills jam when forced Make your choice when asked regardless of your credit Insert bills face up or down Up or down BRONX ZOO AVIARY DHARMA TALK Keep your voice low and you will see More »
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    Cyberdharma and the Net's Vast Reach Paid Member

    When I first encountered the dharma, some two decades ago, it arrived at my door looking achy and lethargic and smelling of beer. In the aftermath of a loud and fragrant freshman dorm party, I had rescued my next-door neighbor from a night spent face-down on the damp floor where he'd slid to a stop and fallen asleep. More »
  • Tricycle Community 12 comments

    Between Two Mountains Paid Member

    For all the horror and trauma that terrorism creates, its lasting power resides in the largely irrational fear we create and then magnify with our minds. Today, statistics show that airplanes are twenty-two times safer than automobiles, yet many people have stopped flying because of the fear that the September 11 attacks engendered. The anthrax scare has caused a widespread reluctance to handle mail, yet only five deaths have resulted from anthrax letters among 30 billion pieces delivered nationwide. We are afraid of death by biological attacks, yet in America some 20,000 people die of the flu each year, and only half of those most at risk get vaccinated. Clearly, the fear of terrorism will not be appeased by providing information, rationalizations, or statistics. It resides in a deep aspect of our consciousness. In order to work with it, we need to understand how it develops. More »
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    One Fat Buddha Paid Member

    In Soto Zen centers, there’s a verse we chant every morning between the dawn sitting and the morning service. The robe that symbolizes the commitment to the Buddha’s way is unfolded from its pouch and placed on top of our heads before we intone, Vast is the robe of liberationA formless field of benefactionI wear the Tathagata teachingsSaving all sentient beings. On many mornings, I indulged my initial amusement at the absurdity of people sitting on their cushions with bundles of cloth piled on their heads. So much of dislocated Japanese Zen ritual can provoke a wince, with its bloodless and robotic pretensions. By contrast, this seemed sweetly—even innocently—kind of silly. More »
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    A Fool's Bargain Paid Member

    BEING A FOOL lets the cat out of my bag, the wind out of my sails. The word comes from the Latin follies, meaning “windbag, a pair of bellows.” The pleasure of being foolish lies precisely in the freedom it gives from self-importance and social expectations; the freedom from striving, from the pressure to impress others, to do things the way others do them. A fool is simply not responsible in the way most people are. He knows he is ultimately not responsible for the way things turn out. He isn’t weighed down by the weight of the world. He knows the world won’t descend into chaos if he takes a nap for half an hour. More »
  • Tricycle Community 10 comments

    Heartfelt Advice Paid Member

    When we are deeply involved in the practice of the Buddha dharma, the sages advise that we practice a common sense of balance by learning to structure our mundane activities and dharma practice in ways that allow us success in both areas of our life. We should not fall into extremes, either of procrastinating in our dharma practice with the excuse of mundane distractions, or of allowing our mundane world to fall apart around us due to an overemphasis on dharma practice which ignores our mundane responsibilities. More »