Travel

Pilgrimage has long been a part of global Buddhist practice
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    A River Runs Through It Paid Member

    From its headwaters north of Crestone, Colorado south to Albuquerque, New Mexico, the northern Rio Grande region is becoming home to a distinctly southwestern Buddhism.Drumbeats pierce the quiet of first light as fires appear at the top of a low mesa that hangs over the eastern edge of the pueblo of Jemez. The pink and yellow hues of the canyon are softened by the haze from the bonfires that line the roads winding between low adobe houses in the village. The people of the pueblo welcome Christmas morning as they have for as long as they have farmed corn along the river and hunted deer in the mountains. More »
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    The Tale Of The Incomparable Prince Paid Member

    The Tale of the Incomparable PrinceMdo Mkhar Tshe Ring Dbang RgyalTranslated by Beth NewmanHarperPerennial: New York, 1997319 pp., $13.00 (paperback). It's not surprising that The Tale of the Incomparable Prince—which its publisher calls "the only pre-exile Tibetan novel"—is full of surprises. An epic tale that builds to a thundering Buddhist sermon, it also disarms modern readers with plenty of romance, lust, intrigue, and violence. More »
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    Manchu Palaces Paid Member

    Machu PalacesJeanne LarsenHenry Holt and Company,Inc.:New York,1996342 pp., $25.00 (hardcover) In China during the Qing dynasty, when hard-riding warriors from Manchuria ruled the vast lands "between the passes," Beijing's new gentry altered the rules of architecture. The Manchu lords built rambling compounds with highly ornamented ritual halls and bed­chambers facing onto courtyards perfumed by fruit trees, all hidden from the squalid streets by high walls. Over generations, new structures rose to meet their needs—a summer house set aside for an infant male heir, or a walled garden, evocative of the hilly south­land, built to cheer a homesick concubine—until brick and mortar came to embody complex genealogy. More »
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    Seeing Buddha: A Photographic Journey Paid Member

    Monks at Paro Taktsang, the main temple complex in Paro, Bhutan, practice a traditional dance to be performed before the public during a religious ceremony. From Seeing Buddha: A Photographic Journey, a collection of over 80 images from 11 countries that aims to capture the essence of Buddhist spiritual practice. A statement from the artist David Butow: When I first began talking about this project, many people asked me, quite reasonably, whether I was a Buddhist. The answer to that question is not so simple: both “yes” and “no” and neither “yes” nor “no.” More »
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    The Happiness Metric Paid Member

    On Friday evenings in Thimphu, the capital of Bhutan, men, women, and children throng the main street, flowing together in a slow dance. Swaggering teenage boys, arms slung over each other’s shoulders, speak in surprisingly gentle voices. Stray dogs assertively cohabit the city. One often hears singing—on sidewalks, pouring out of windows, on construction sites. The melodies persist in the undulating countryside, where men engaged in matches of archery or darts break into congratulatory chants when the other side scores. More »
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    The Loneliest Road in America Paid Member

    We dropped down from Lake Tahoe into the Great Basin. The signage warned us about a veritable Noah’s Ark of animal life: bear, deer, cattle, moose, horses, men on horses, men on tractors. It got hot, fast. Ninety-two miles in we had lunch in Fallon, Nevada. Then we entered the desert, our motorcycles shredding the silence. When I mentioned to Hunter, my riding companion, that the next stretch of 409 miles was known as the Loneliest Road in America, his response was “Well, I’m the loneliest man in America.” More »