Social Justice

Buddhism teaches that we are noble by our actions, not by birth or circumstance
  • Tricycle Community 61 comments

    Let Them Eat Empathy Paid Member

    I’m no marketing executive, but I’ve watched enough TV to understand the basic syllogism underlying all endorsements: celebrity X is well-liked; celebrity X will appear with a product; therefore the product will be well-liked. Variations arise, of course, depending on what the advertisers are trying to sell. They get Megan Fox to endorse jeans because she’s sexy. They get George Clooney to endorse tequila because he’s classy. And, as it turns out, they get His Holiness the Dalai Lama to endorse market capitalism because he’s virtuous. More »
  • Tricycle Community 13 comments

    The Man-made Obstacle Paid Member

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    Every Revolution Needs Fresh Poems Paid Member

    Every revolution needs fresh poemsthat is the reasonpoetry cannot die.It is the reason poetsgo without sleepand sometimes without loverswithout new carsand without fine clothesthe reason we committo facing the darkandresign ourselves, regularly, to the possibilityof being wrong.Poetry is leading us.It never cares how we willbe held by loversor drive fastor look goodin the moment;but about how completelywe are committedto movementboth inner and outer;and devoted to transformationand to change. From The World Will Follow Joy: Turning Madness into Flowers, by Alice Walker © 2014 The New Press. Reprinted with permission of the publisher. More »
  • The Attack at Home Paid Member

    While the attention of the country has been riveted on President Obama’s proposals to launch missile strikes in Syria, hidden in the shadows, the House of Representatives has been busily preparing an attack of its own. This attack will not be directed against a foreign government accused of massacring innocent civilians with chemical weapons. Rather, it will be launched right here at home, and its targets are our fellow citizens, whose crime is simply being poor and dependent on federal assistance in order to eat and feed their families. More »
  • The (Justifiably) Angry Marxist Paid Member

    In April 2006, the Japanese cultural anthropologist Noriyuki Ueda met the Dalai Lama for two days of conversation in Dharmasala, India. The discussion, recently translated from the Japanese text, covers such topics as the usefulness of anger, the role of compassion in society, and social and economic justice. "I believe that Buddhism has a big role to play in the world today," Ueda tells His Holiness, "and I am impatient because Buddhists don't seem to realize that." In this interview, Ueda offers us a rare peek into the the political and economic mind of one of the world's most famous spiritual leaders. More »
  • Wrong Mindfulness Paid Member

    Hozan Alan Senauke is a Soto Zen priest, activist, and the former director of Buddhist Peace Fellowship. He is an advisor to the International Network of Engaged Buddhists and founder of the Clear View Project, which focuses on social change and relief efforts in Asia. He also happens to be an accomplished folk musician. In March, Radio host John Malkin interviewed Senauke on his show “The Great Leap Forward” on Free Radio Santa Cruz. The two spoke about the confluence of Buddhism and social justice, Buddhist Anarchism, and where Engaged Buddhism stands today.   More »