Social Justice

Buddhism teaches that we are noble by our actions, not by birth or circumstance
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    Good Work Paid Member

    Dana (“giving”) is the most fundamental of all Buddhist practices. It is the first topic in the Buddha’s graduated talks, the first step on the bodhisattva’s path to perfection, and the first of the ten paramitas  (perfections) in the Mahayana tradition. It therefore sets the tone for all that follows in the spiritual journey. -Andrew Olendzki, "Dana" Tricycle's "Good Work" section, complete list: More »
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    The Great Compassion Paid Member

    Patricia Kanaya Usuki was born in Toronto, Canada, to an Anglican father and a Buddhist mother. Her parents brought her up in the United Church of Canada, one of the few Canadian religious institutions that welcomed people of Asian heritage. More »
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    Good Work Summer 2011 Paid Member

    Shinjo Ito, the founder of Shinnyo-en Buddhism, a Japanese Vajrayana school, once wrote, “Faith is not about preaching or philosophy. It is action to which you dedicate your whole being.” Shinnyo-en Buddhists strive to consider the hardships of others as their own and then meditate on how to respond. Reacting to the recent events in Japan—or to any disaster—is not about asking “Why?” but rather “What can I do?” More »
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    "Letter to the Wall Street Journal," 1966 Paid Member

    Every American wants MORE MORE of the world and why not, you only live once. But the mistake made in America is persons accumulate more more dead matter, machinery, possessions & rugs & fact information at the expense of what really counts as more: feeling, good feeling, sex feeling, tenderness feeling, mutual feeling. You own twice as much rug if you're twice as aware of the rug. Possessing more means being aware of more: & that "awareness" is banked in areas we call feeling. Bodily feeling sense or sensual feeling. More »
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    The International Year of Tibet Paid Member

    INTRODUCTION More »
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    Unconditional Service Paid Member

    Why is volunteerism and other social work so central to Shinnyo Buddhism’s practice? Master Shinjo understood that the training within the traditional Buddhist framework would lead to one’s own enlightenment as a monk, but he believed religion had to be able to help more people, including those who were not especially religious, in ways that suit their different circumstances. He incorporated new practices such as volunteerism so our sangha [community] could offer assistance to the widest range of people. People who are interested in traditional Buddhist training are always welcome, but volunteer activities provide an additional avenue for Shinnyo-en to contribute to the wider secular community. More »