Social Justice

Buddhism teaches that we are noble by our actions, not by birth or circumstance
  • Theravada Buddhism’s Muslim Problem Paid Member

    Buddhist and Muslim leaders meet to discuss peace initiatives at the Yogyakarta meeting in Indonesia, March 2015.  Buddhist radicalism is on the rise in countries like Myanmar and Sri Lanka. Since 2012, both countries have witnessed severe violence against their Muslim minorities. Attacks take place in an atmosphere of strong anti-Muslim rhetoric put forward by certain monk-led nationalist groups, and the (largely unknown) orchestrators and perpetrators of these attacks operate with impunity. More »
  • The Buddhists Go to Washington Paid Member

    Buddhist leaders gather in the White House on May 14 for a meeting with government officials. Last Thursday 125 prominent Buddhist figures from a range of traditions gathered in Washington, DC, for the first meeting between White House and State Department officials and Buddhist faith groups. Teachers from the Sinhalese, Cambodian, Burmese, Bangladeshi, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Tibetan, Vietnamese, and Thai Buddhist lineages attended, as well as scholars, activists, and leaders of convert groups who do not affiliate with any one particular Asian school.  More »
  • An Unholy Alliance Paid Member

    Thailand’s military government, which seized control of the country in a coup last May, has taken a special interest in Thai Buddhism and the moral authority its institutions command. After settling into power and naming itself the National Council for Peace and Order, the junta immediately set off on a paternalistic mission to rid Thailand of corruption, immorality, and anything deemed “un-Thai” (like underboobs, for example). Since Buddhism makes up such an integral part of the agreed upon definition of “Thai-ness,” junta leaders quickly set their sights on religious reform, installing a special panel to focus on the “protection of Buddhism” within their National Reform Council (NRC). More »
  • You Yourself Are Oatmeal Paid Member

    Roshi Pat Enkyo O’Hara is founder and abbot of the Village Zendo in New York City, and the author of Most Intimate: A Zen Approach to Life’s Challenges. We talked in her office on April 13, 2010. —Richard P. Boyle  More »
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    Awake with Others Paid Member

    Early Buddhist texts, as translated, have a tendency to place a surprisingly negative spin on the notion of existing in the “world.” Worldly life is often depicted as a dirty realm inhabited by those still caught up in their samsaric commute, those blinded by activities of commerce and romance, those who have yet to get serious about the spiritual journey. Before we start thinking that Buddhism is some world-denouncing pursuit, we have to understand the cultural context of such ancient statements. More »
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    Q&A with Mahesh Ashok Deokar Paid Member

    Profession: Professor of the Pali language Age: 43Location: Pune, India More »