Social Justice

Buddhism teaches that we are noble by our actions, not by birth or circumstance
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Of Samurai and Sisterhood Paid Member

    Alexis: Many of us came into Buddhism at the same time that we came into feminism, at least the three of us, and so we were wondering for you, how these two isms, Buddhism and feminism, are complementary and how are they contradictory? I find them complementary, and it’s probably because my personal and academic interests in feminism have been about the self and the formation of gender. I teach a course called “The Construction and Deconstruction of Gender,” which almost sounds like a course on Buddhism—in both cases it seems to me that the practice is about letting go of the labels and identities that limit us. I’m not sure I have ever found feminism and Buddhism in conflict. Because I see any feminist issue—like any issue ever, anywhere in the universe—as a Zen issue. More »
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    Meditation In Action Paid Member

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  • Interbeing with Thich Nhat Hanh: An Interview Paid Member

    Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh was born in central Vietnam in October 1926 and became a monk at the age of sixteen. During the Vietnam War, he left his monastery and became actively engaged in helping victims of the war and publicly advocating peace. In 1966, he toured the United States at the invitation of the Fellowship of Reconciliation "to describe the aspirations and the agony of the voiceless masses of the Vietnamese people." As a result, he was threatened with arrest in Vietnam and unable to return. He served as the chairman of the Vietnamese Buddhist Peace Delegation during the war and in 1967 was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. More »
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    Contemplating Corporate Culture Paid Member

    Mirabai Bush is the director of The Center for Contemplative Mind in Society. Based in Massachusetts, its mission is to bring contemplative practice into mainstream institutional life. Corporations, media organizations, law schools, and universities have sponsored programs directed by the Center. Prior to co-founding the Center in 1996, Bush was the director of the Guatemala Project and the Compassionate Action Project for Seva Foundation. A Buddhist practitioner for the past thirty years, she is also co-author, with Ram Dass, of Compassion in Action: Setting Out on the Path of Service. This interview was conducted in New York City by Helen Tworkov in March 2001.What was the initial motivation behind the Center for Contemplative Mind? More »
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    Socially Engaged Buddhism for the New Millennium; Global Healing; The Wheel of Engaged Buddhism Paid Member

    Socially Engaged Buddhism for the New MilleniumEssays in Honor of the Ven. Phgra Dhammapitaka (Bhikkhu P. A. Payutto) On His 60th Birthday AnniversaryEdited by Sulak Sivaraksa, Pipob Udomittipong, and Chris WalkerSathirakoses-Nagapradipa Foundation and Foundation for Children: Bangkok, 1999(Distributed by Parallax Press, Berekely)536 pp.; $38 (paper) Global HealingSulak SivarakasaThai Inter-Religious Commiission for Development, Sathirakoses-Nagapradipa Foundation: Bangkok, 1999(Distributed by Parallax Press, Berkeley)171 pp.; $15 (paper) More »
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    In Exile from Siam Paid Member

    In September 1991, Sulak Sivaraksa was accused of lese majesty for remarks made at Thammasat University in Bangkok which were critical of Thailand's authorities. Under threat of arrest by Thailand's military junta, Sulak—as he is known—fled his country and has since been in exile from Siam (the country's original name, which Sulak insists on using). One of Asia's leading social activists, Sulak is the founder of the International Network of Engaged Buddhists. He has taught all over the United States, and his most recent publication is Seeds of Peace (Parallax Press). In April, he was interviewed at the Tricycle office by editor Helen Tworkov. More »