Social Justice

Buddhism teaches that we are noble by our actions, not by birth or circumstance
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Contemplating Corporate Culture Paid Member

    Mirabai Bush is the director of The Center for Contemplative Mind in Society. Based in Massachusetts, its mission is to bring contemplative practice into mainstream institutional life. Corporations, media organizations, law schools, and universities have sponsored programs directed by the Center. Prior to co-founding the Center in 1996, Bush was the director of the Guatemala Project and the Compassionate Action Project for Seva Foundation. A Buddhist practitioner for the past thirty years, she is also co-author, with Ram Dass, of Compassion in Action: Setting Out on the Path of Service. This interview was conducted in New York City by Helen Tworkov in March 2001.What was the initial motivation behind the Center for Contemplative Mind? More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Socially Engaged Buddhism for the New Millennium; Global Healing; The Wheel of Engaged Buddhism Paid Member

    Socially Engaged Buddhism for the New MilleniumEssays in Honor of the Ven. Phgra Dhammapitaka (Bhikkhu P. A. Payutto) On His 60th Birthday AnniversaryEdited by Sulak Sivaraksa, Pipob Udomittipong, and Chris WalkerSathirakoses-Nagapradipa Foundation and Foundation for Children: Bangkok, 1999(Distributed by Parallax Press, Berekely)536 pp.; $38 (paper) Global HealingSulak SivarakasaThai Inter-Religious Commiission for Development, Sathirakoses-Nagapradipa Foundation: Bangkok, 1999(Distributed by Parallax Press, Berkeley)171 pp.; $15 (paper) More »
  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    In Exile from Siam Paid Member

    In September 1991, Sulak Sivaraksa was accused of lese majesty for remarks made at Thammasat University in Bangkok which were critical of Thailand's authorities. Under threat of arrest by Thailand's military junta, Sulak—as he is known—fled his country and has since been in exile from Siam (the country's original name, which Sulak insists on using). One of Asia's leading social activists, Sulak is the founder of the International Network of Engaged Buddhists. He has taught all over the United States, and his most recent publication is Seeds of Peace (Parallax Press). In April, he was interviewed at the Tricycle office by editor Helen Tworkov. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    In the News Paid Member

    AMNESTY TAKES ON CHINA Amnesty International, the human rights advocacy group, is launching a campaign in May to bring greater attention to the atrocities cited by Tibetan prisoners of conscience. Amnesty has evidence of over one hundred prisoners of conscience in the Tibetan Autonomous Region, including Buddhist monks and nuns incarcerated for peacefully advocating Tibet's independence from The People's Republic of China. Many prisoners have been held without a trial in labor camps and jails. Reports of brutal beatings, repeated electric shocks, and prolonged solitary confinement carried out by Chinese officials spurred immediate action. More »
  • In the News: Summer 1995 Paid Member

    On March 3 a Vietnamese Buddhist monk was stabbed to death by a homeless man whom he had taken into his temple in Philadelphia. Thich Hanh Man, 43, had served only three months as resident monk at Philadelphia’s first Vietnamese Buddhist temple when the attack occurred. Though other members of the temple had warned him about Lan-Ngoc Nguyen, a Vietnamese homeless man whose past, they said, included arrests and a history of mental illness, Man felt that it was his duty as a monk to offer help. Police said they saw evidence of a struggle in the temple kitchen. Members of the temple who knew Man, however, said that the turned-over tables and chairs were evidence not of a fight, but of a chase. Man, they said, who outweighed his attacker by twenty pounds, would have been trying to escape when he was stabbed nine times. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Journey Through Holy Lands Paid Member