Family

Buddhist teachings on family life
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Love Becomes Her Paid Member

    I grew up an only child in suburban Los Gatos, California. One of my closest friends, Maria, came from a large, warm, rambunctious Chilean family. I envied the love that seemed to surround her. Maria’s most cherished possession was her bicycle. She rode it everywhere and took very good care of it. She had such a passion for that bike that she learned everything about how it worked and what it needed, and eventually got a job repairing bikes for other people. The love she felt for her bike made it glow—made it seem like the most desirable object on earth. More »
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    Full Moons and Dirty Diapers Paid Member

    My infant daughter Jordan doesn't let me sit zazen. All day, she conspires with her older sister Erin so that when the toddler naps, the infant is awake and when the infant naps, the toddler is awake. The day is a blur of diapers and drool, tears and laughter, and when at last night comes and they both fall asleep, I sit down on my zafu and pass out. More »
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    Do Less, Accomplish More Paid Member

    Ilustrations by Seyed Alavi More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Beyond Blame Paid Member

    Hug, David Hilliard, 2008, c-print, 3 panels, 24 x 20 inches   More »
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    Introduction: Teaching Your Children Buddhist Values Paid Member

    Of all the thousands of the Buddha's teachings, he directed a very few—three or four, depending on what you count—specifically to children. Considering the multitude and breadth of his suttas, it's hard to imagine why more weren't geared to kids: was it because following his path requires a mature mind and mature commitment? Or was it because Indian society twenty-six hundred years ago had the instruction of children firmly in household hand—if adult family members were following the Buddha, children would naturally absorb the lessons and culture of the dharma, too. Or perhaps—and this is a personal guess—it was because the Buddha's principal teaching to a child so perfectly encapsulated the dharma that little else needed to be said. More »
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    The Gift of Gratitude Paid Member

    Even if one should carry about one’s mother on one shoulder and one’s father on the other, and so doing should live a hundred years . . . moreover, if one should set them up as supreme rulers, having absolute rule over the wide earth abounding in the seven treasures—not even by this could one repay one’s parents. And why! Bhikkhus, parents do a lot for their children: they bring them up, provide them with food, introduce them to the world. More »