Buddhist teachings on family life
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    Dissolving Into Blue Sky Paid Member

    My mother planned to die at home. But she died in the hospital, near her home in Maine, because m that moment, when her growing shortness of breath so frightened and unnerved her, the hospital was where she chose to be. It was the right decision for her, and she was glad to have made it. More »
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    Planting Paradise Paid Member

    Last summer about this time when the Dragon Tongue beans began to thicken their speckled fingers and clutch heavy to the vine, I helped plant a circular "house" of sunflowers with an eager passel of kids. This sunflower circle was a ragged ring of paradise planted on the far edge of the kitchen garden near our giant Rosebrook apple tree. More »
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    ZenX: A Prescription for Despair Paid Member

    This roundtable was conducted in July 1996 by Helen Tworkov in Rochester, New York. The participants, all in their twenties, were residents of the Rochester Zen Center at the time of the conversation. More »
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    Manchu Palaces Paid Member

    Machu PalacesJeanne LarsenHenry Holt and Company,Inc.:New York,1996342 pp., $25.00 (hardcover) In China during the Qing dynasty, when hard-riding warriors from Manchuria ruled the vast lands "between the passes," Beijing's new gentry altered the rules of architecture. The Manchu lords built rambling compounds with highly ornamented ritual halls and bed­chambers facing onto courtyards perfumed by fruit trees, all hidden from the squalid streets by high walls. Over generations, new structures rose to meet their needs—a summer house set aside for an infant male heir, or a walled garden, evocative of the hilly south­land, built to cheer a homesick concubine—until brick and mortar came to embody complex genealogy. More »
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    Slow and Sincere Paid Member

    FOR TEN YEARS I LIVED as a nun in Zen temples in Korea. Every year I loved to see some food appear just once to mark a special occasion. For New Year we looked forward to adzuki bean soup with sticky rice balls for breakfast, five-grain rice at lunch, spicy persimmon punch and sweet rice drink for dessert; for the harvest festival we made half-moon rice cakes filled with sweet bean paste. When the summer was very hot we were served cold stringy buckwheat noodles in cold soy milk broth (not my favorite, l must say). More »
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    What Is Karma? Paid Member