Environment

Preserving our environment and mindful consumption are a part of our practice
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    The Burning Present Paid Member

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    Clouding Paid Member

    Traditionally, clouds are symbolic of things indeterminate. Composed of air and water, their essential nature can be attributed to neither element but arises in an obscuring of the two, a betwixt-and-between phenomenon, not unlike human beings, those nebulous creatures who themselves seem caught between realms, floating along between the shimmering horizons of birth and death, here and there, earth and heaven. Buddhist psychology refers to the aggregate of what we call personality as “the five clouds of entanglement.” More »
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    Stop Shopping Paid Member

    I doubt that you need to hear more dire predictions about the ongoing destruction of our natural environment in order to be motivated to work to save it. In fact, too many dire predictions can make us throw up our hands in despair. So I’m not going to tell you how many species a day are becoming extinct, or how soon your home will be covered by melted polar ice. You already know it’s too many and too soon. More »
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    Wild Berries Paid Member

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    The Green Buddha Paid Member

    What does it mean to be “green” and “Buddhist?” The Green Buddha is traditionally the Laughing Buddha, bringer of prosperity and mirth. His iconic image can be found everywhere from curio shelves to a 1950s film about art theft. But in this age of environmental loss and degradation, “green” and “Buddhist” together should come to mean something new, something about the imperative to face the loss and work to protect the future. The connection between environmental activism and Buddhist practice exists, though it is not always easy to draw. More »
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    Radiator Charlie's Mortgage-Lifter Tomato Paid Member

    In August my gardener hands are stained nicotine dark from the resinous sap of tangled tomato vines heavy with summer fruit. In the spell of the nightshades I return to my first season of growing tomatoes at Tassajara Zen Mountain Center, deep in the Ventana wilderness of central California. Anchored by a daily meditation schedule of dawn and nighttime zazen, the tomato plants of the Tassajara garden kept my practice grounded by day. Now, almost 35 years later, the intrepid tomato continues to provide long hours of mindfulness and the real wealth of a succulent harvest. More »