Arts & Culture

The growing influence of Buddhist artistic expression in contemporary culture
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    The Science Delusion Paid Member

    Curtis White pulls no punches. To readers who see in Buddhism little room for spirited debate, White’s unapologetic bluntness may seem unexpected or even jarring. But for White—Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English at Illinois State University, novelist, and author of several works of criticism including the 2003 international bestseller The Middle Mind: Why Americans Don’t Think for Themselves—there is too much at stake in our current intellectual climate to indulge in timid discussion. More »
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    Antonio Tàpies Exhibtion at the Guggenheim Museum SoHo Paid Member

    Emptiness was both subject and source for the Abstract Expressionists. Within the boundaries defined by an empty white canvas, they found an arena for action and awareness, and they explored it with varying degrees of clarity. Some, such as Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, painted from the deep unconscious, from that free place beyond rational calculation. Others, such as Robert Motherwell molded an ideal of freedom with the tool kit of an intellectual. More »
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    Tommy, can you Hear me? Paid Member

    1. If I have open-head surgery and my brains are replaced by my alarm clock, am I still Tommy? 2. Was van Gogh with one ear the same as van Gogh with two ears? 3. If I take a vacation, will I still be Tommy? 4. If I take Prozac, will I still be Tommy? 5. If I get a face-lift, an ass nip, hair coloring, breast implants, and liposuction, will I be Jane Fonda? 6. Is Jane Fonda still Jane Fonda? 7. Is Jane Fonda becoming? 8. Is Jane Fonda becoming Jane Fonda? 9. If  you call me by my true name, am I still Tommy? 10. If I become Lama Pajama, am I still Tommy? 11. Does my true name have to include Jane Fonda? More »
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    A Matter of Misdirection Paid Member

    In “Indian Camp,” the first story in Hemingway’s first book, In Our Time, a boy and his father paddle out on a lake to an island where a pregnant Native American woman is having a hard labor. The boy is shocked both by her suffering and by the general poverty of the camp. He waits as his father, a doctor, helps deliver the baby; the boy doesn’t pay attention—nor do we—to the woman’s husband lying on a nearby bunk. Unable to endure the sound of his wife’s birth pains or his certainty of the new child’s miserable prospects, the man slits his own throat. But the author only lets us see this late in the tale; most of the way we think the story is about the boy and his father. All along, without our even noticing, another more pressing series of events has been unfolding right under our eyes. More »
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    How to Read an Empty Blackboard Paid Member

    The bathrooms are first. I edit the opinions, critiques, quotations, confessions, cartoons, entreaties, and general philosophies limned the night before. That’s my job. Clean up the walls at the restaurant. All four walls of two unisex bathrooms. They are blackboard walls, with sticks of colored chalk sitting in a thin trough just above the old cedar wainscoting. More »
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    An interview with Dorothy Iannone Paid Member

    Profession: ArtistAge: 79Location: Berlin, Germany More »