Arts & Culture

The growing influence of Buddhist artistic expression in contemporary culture
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    Divine Play Paid Member

    Vara: A BlessingDirected by Khyentse NorbuProduced by Nanette NelmsReleased October 3, 201396 minutes More »
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    Get Meditating, Houston! Paid Member

    Nighttime rendering of the Meditation Station in a downtown Houston, Texas park, courtesy of Peter Longoria and Nicholas Weiss of Harrison Kornberg Architects. More »
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    A Full Load of Moonlight Paid Member

    Ten Stanzas Written on Cloud-Shrouded Terrace (No. 6) Sitting upright at the foot of clouds, too lazy to lift my head,I have no more dharma words for the Chan practitioners.Everything under the sun makes plain the Path—might as well hang my mouth on the wall and shut up. —Huaishen (1077–1132) I’m Happy with My Way of Life More »
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    Buddhism Beat & Square Paid Member

    One afternoon in 1953, a young poet named Allen Ginsberg visited the First Zen Institute which was then still housed in an elegant private uptown apartment in New York City. Ginsberg occupied himself by perusing the Zen paintings, records and books in the library. But he did not stay very long: the whole atmosphere of the place made him uncomfortable; it was, as he remembered years later, “intimidating—like a university club.” Ginsberg had only recently discovered Buddhism and Chinese philosophy in the New York Public Library. “I had only the faintest idea that there was so much of a kulcheral heritage, so easy to get at thru book upon book of reproduction,” he wrote Neal Cassady in California. More »
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    Reflections of the Flowerbank World Paid Member

    Detail from Unattached, Unbound, Liberated Kindness, 2013. Pencil, gouache, 22 karat gold, and gum arabic on rice paper. More »
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    The Flute Teacher Paid Member

    Contemporary Chinese writer and government critic Liao Yiwu first began writing his memoir, For a Song and a Hundred Songs: A Poet’s Journey through a Chinese Prison, in 1993, three years after he was imprisoned for composing the incendiary poem “Massacre,” a response to the 1989 student protests at Tiananmen Square. He spent three years of his four-year sentence at the Song Mountain Investigation Center before being transferred to a labor camp in Sichuan Province. More »