Arts & Culture

The growing influence of Buddhist artistic expression in contemporary culture
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    Rivers in the Stream Paid Member

    WEEZER’S “BEVERLY HILLS” was the second most downloaded song on iTunes last year. The first single from the L.A. band’s 2005 album, Make Believe, was #1 on the Billboard modern rock charts and was nominated for a Grammy for Best Rock Song. The video was shot at the Playboy Mansion, where lead singer Rivers Cuomo, 36, played his guitar among skimpily dressed Bunnies. They sauntered around him, moving to the beat, playing soccer, and, you know, just being Bunnies. More »
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    Beyond Rangoon Paid Member

    BURMA IS, IN ITS WAY, a kind of shadow Tibet, Tibet without the glamour or mystique, a "Land of Buddhas" as devoutly constant as the land of six thousand monasteries to the north. The charms of its premodern culture have been preserved from the modern world by a policy of inwardness. Its people have a good nature and gentle strength that instantly convert every visitor to their cause. And for thirty years now, it has been suffering a demeaning and remorseless repression that the rest of the world is either unable or unwilling to combat. A nation is dying in silence there (in some ways, it is dead already, Burma having been renamed “Myanmar” by its oppressors). More »
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    Free Expression Paid Member

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    Homelessness Into Home Paid Member

    India in the sixth century B.C.E. was especially alive with religious adepts going about their business alone or in the company of others. But monastic institutions as we know them, did not exist then, nor did monasteries exist in Buddhism during the Buddha’s lifetime. The pre-Buddhist ideal of the world-renouncing mendicant is already acknowledged in the legend of the “four-signs” which leads to Prince Siddhartha’s renunciation: after seeing examples of old age, sickness, and death, the Buddha-to-be sees a self-composed, serene, and alert “bhikku.” The ideal of this nomadic, world-renouncing lifestyle was well established in Vedic period prior to Buddhism. More »
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    Smiling Not Smiling Paid Member

    Following high school in New York City, Noah Buschel went to Los Angeles where he began writing “Neal Cassady,” which later won Square Magazine’s Screenplay of the Year Award 2000. He now lives in Greenwich Village with two friends and a dog named Cassady, and is working on another bio-screenplay, “Soshin,” on the life of the American Zen student Maura O’Halloran. The following narrative was compiled from a conversation with Tricycle last February. More »
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    In The News Paid Member

    Power Plays in Korea For months, images became increasingly bizarre. Shaven-headed monks in yellow construction helmets. Opposing monks in gray robes and combat boots. Barricades, firebombs, burning furniture, bodyguards, bulldozers, praying mothers, a melee. At issue: leadership of Korea’s largest Buddhist sect, the Chogye order, with opposing factions attempting to gain control of an annual budget of $9.2 million, property valued in the millions, and the appointment of 1,700 monks to various duties, including head monks at 24 parish temples. An estimated 10 million followers (approximately one fourth of South Korea’s population) belong to the Chogye order, which emphasizes meditation and dates back to the early Koryo period (917-1392). More »