Arts & Culture

The growing influence of Buddhist artistic expression in contemporary culture
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    Buddha On The Rio Grande Paid Member

    For centuries, the northern stretch of the Rio Grande has lured religious seekers to its stark, awesome landscape. And as the people—among them Pueblo Indians, Spanish Catholics, and now a growing population of American and Asian Buddhists—have settled in, the region has marked their practices with its indelible stamp. Guest editor: Michael HaederleImage: The canyon of the Rio Grande near Toas, circa 1911. Photo by H. F. Robinson, courtesy of the Museum of New Mexico.  More »
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    The Voyage: An Opera by Philip Glass Paid Member

    The Voyage begins when the Scientist in a wheel-chair with a computerized voice-box sings: Quarks, kooksHeretics, lunaticsLovers and defilers of GodSet off in leaky vesselsTowards the holes on the horizonWith fautly fuel linesAnd failing eyesightAnd limbs quite inadequateAnd minds finally limitedTo the certaintyThat the inadequate body can followWhere the inadequate mind has been When my daughter was born, I smiled like a hyenaAnd for a moment I felt my legs and my limbsFor a moment I knewNo boundaries A body, a planet, a universe, a mindFor whom the limits do not apply The voyage lies whereThe vision liesThere More »
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    In the News Paid Member

    PRETENDER TO THE THRONE In our last issue we reported on the outrage of Chinese officials when the Dalai  Lama announced that a six-year­old Tibetan boy, Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, had been determined to be the reincarnation of the tenth Panchen Lama, who died in January 1989. The Chinese government claimed that, under the terms ofa 1792 Qing Dynasty agreement, they had the right to approve the selection of all important lamas found in Tibet. Now the Chinese government has installed its own selection, six-year­ old Gyaincain Norbu, thus effectively creating a rival Panchen Lama. More »
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    Mountains And Rivers Without End Paid Member

    Mountains And Rivers Without EndGary SnyderCounterpoint: Washington, D.C., 1996 165 pp., $20.00 (hardcover) More »
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    Yungchen Llamo Paid Member

    THERE IS A SAYING in Tibet that a beautiful voice can make a wild animal stop dead in its tracks and listen. Such a voice, and its pacifying potential, are the Tibetan singer Yungchen Lhamo's karma. A few days after her birth, her mother presented her to a lama who named her “Goddess of Song”. For much of her life, though, singing was just an occasional luxury. Eight years ago, she fled Chinese-occupied Tibet, trekked across the Himalayas, and arrived half-dead in Dharamsala with a single-minded quest: to see his Holiness the Dalai Lama and study the dharma. Today, she has a stunning record, “Tibet, Tibet,” on Peter Gabriel’s Real World label, and a blessing from His Holiness: To fulfill her Bodhisattva Vows, he told her, she must use her voice to help spread some understanding and appreciation of Tibetan culture, as China does its best to stamp it out. More »
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    In The News Paid Member

    PAGODA SIEGEVietnam's communist government intensified its crackdown on the Unified Buddhist Church (UBC) when more than 200 armed security forces raided a 400-year-old pagoda in Hue and arrested two prominent monks there in November. The International Buddhist Information Bureau, a foreign organ of the UBC, said that the raid was part of a government plan to evict UBC monks from the Linh Mu pagoda, a treasured monument and longtime center of Buddhist activism, and place it under the charge of the state­sponsored Vietnamese Buddhist Church. Both monks arrested in the siege, Thich Hai Thinh and Thich Hai Chahn, had already served time in Vietnamese jails for supporting the UBC in a 1993 march for religious freedom. More »