Zen

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Chopping Onions Paid Member

    Cleaning the bathroom or chopping the onions is no less important than sitting in deep meditation. Grasping this and acting on it is called waking up. —Janet Jiryu Abels, “Participate Fully” "Chop wood, carry water" is a Zen saying. In other words, just do what you are doing, nothing more, nothing less. As Yoda would say, Simple it is not. Chopping onions, I almost chopped off the tip of my left index finger. I had to wrap my hand in a tea towel and sit down, and reconsider my entire life while the tea towel bloomed red. More »
  • The Zen Master Goes Black Friday Shopping Paid Member

    When the Zen master Black Friday shops, it is not hard to understand! When breathing, breathe! When Black Friday shopping, shop! When finding "jingle socks" and "scarves for her," and "hostess gifts under $25," just find them. Go to aisles 7 and 14 and 15 and find them! Do not rush, but neither shall you go slow like the snail climbing Mt. Fuji, and miss out on the Crock Pot Spectacular.  More »
  • A Fractal Solution to the Universe Paid Member

    If you’ve perused the current issue of Tricycle, you’ll have seen the beautiful and intricate artwork that illustrates our article about the convergence of Buddhism and neuroscience, “A Gray Matter,” by Columbia University professor of Japanese religion Bernard Faure. If these images seem hauntingly familiar, it’s for a reason. They’re of the neurons in our brains! The artist behind them, Greg Dunn, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a doctorate in neuroscience last year. Since then, he’s been focusing on painting in his easily identifiable style: a modern, science-based twist on the ancient East Asian brush painting technique of sumi-e. More »
  • Conveying Our Wishes: Week 2 of Caroline Yongue's Retreat Paid Member

    This week begins "Conveying Our Wishes," the second week of Caroline Yongue's retreat on preparing for death. In this installment, Yongue enumerates a variety of options for near- and after-death care, and advises us to carefully consider these options. They include choices regarding hospice care, funerary preferences, and organ and tissue donation. It is best to evaluate these choices now, with our loved ones in mind, and make a plan and act on it when we are still able. This is the best way to ensure that our loved ones will not be harmed or suffer unnecessary anguish when we pass. If you are a Tricycle Supporting or Sustaining Member, you can watch this week's retreat here. If not, join or upgrade your membership here. Here's a preview of this week's retreat: More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    If You're Lucky, Your Heart Will Break: Field Notes from a Zen Life Paid Member

    Author and blogger James Ishmael Ford is a dually-appointed Unitarian Universalist minister and Soto Zen Priest. His newest book, If You're Lucky, Your Heart Will Break: Field Notes from a Zen Life, was published by Wisdom Publications in September. The following passage is excerpted from the chapter "Spiritual Directors." More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Everything Necessary to Salvation Paid Member

    James Ishmael Ford is a Buddhist teacher, author, and blogger who embraces Zen Buddhism within the structure of American religious tradition. He serves both as a Unitarian Universalist minister at the First Unitarian Church of Providence and a Soto Zen priest with the Boundless Way Zen network. Ford is the author of the classic Zen Master Who?, a useful guide to North America's Zen teachers, traditions, and sanghas. His most recent book, If You're Lucky, Your Heart Will Break: Field Notes from a Zen Life, leaves no stone unturned in constructing an intimate, multifaceted reflection on the Zen path, drawing on sources as diverse as the Bible and stand-up comics. More »