Zen

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    Looking Back Paid Member

    Today we were pleasantly reminded of the late Zen priest and author Darlene Cohen when we received a beautiful, two-volumed boxed set of The Noisiest Book Review in the Known World: The Best of RALPH: The Review of Arts, Literature, Philosophy and the Humanities, in which our Fall 2005 interview with Cohen is being reprinted. Cohen, who suffered from rheumatoid arthritis, wrote extensively on dealing with chronic pain, both physical and emotional. In her Q&A with Tricycle's features editor Andrew Cooper, her sharp wit really shines through. We thought we'd share a laugh by posting the brief interview in its entirety here: More »
  • Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt Paid Member

    Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt is a new book from Parallax Press by landscape architect and author Zachiah Murray, with a foreword by Thich Nhat Hanh. Predicated upon the Zen conviction that the garden is a perfect place to practice mindfulness, the book offers a series simple short verses, called gathas, to assist us in cultivating deep awareness through the practice of gardening. The following excerpt begins the book. Entering the Garden Entering the gardenI see my true nature.In its reflectionmy heart is at peace. We cross many thresholds in our lives. Some thresholds are monumental—being born, learning to walk, starting school, graduating, getting our first job, losing our first job, getting married, giving birth, and dying. Other thresholds are subtle—moving from one room to another, passing through a gate, or crossing an intersection. More »
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    Getting There From Here Paid Member

    Today we have a guest post from writer and Zen practitioner Sam Guthrie. In "Getting There From Here," Guthrie grapples with his contradictory desire for enlightenment. I sit facing the wall on a small round black cushion, legs pretzeled, feet wedged implausibly onto opposite thighs. The burning in my knees has taken on an almost mystical quality. I try to be in the present moment, to be one with the unholy pain screaming in my body. If you can be one with it, it is supposed to hurt less, or at least differently. More »
  • Every Meow and Zen... Paid Member

    The Tricycle team found this floating around on Facebook...it's originally from George Takei's page. Takei is an actor and gay rights activist. Or you might know him as that guy from Star Trek. Every meow and zen, I feel silly. More »
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    Zen and the Art Paid Member

    This blog post comes our way from Henry Shukman, a prize-winning poet and novelist. His most recent novel, The Lost City, was a New York Times Editor’s Choice. He is also an authorized Zen teacher in the Sanbo Kyodan Zen lineage, and he teaches at Mountain Cloud Zen Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In the current issue of Tricycle, Shukman wrote a feature article on the "Zen and the Art" phenomenon. More »
  • Q & A with the Dalai Grandma Paid Member

    Welcome back to our blogger Q & A series! Today we have an interview with Jeanne Desy of the "Dalai Grandma" blog, whose guest post, "Zen Out in the Cold," we published just last week. Jeanne, also known as the Dalai Grandma, is a Zen practitioner from Ohio who writes about her daily life with a Buddhist spin. Although she frequently blogs, unapologetically, about difficult topics—dealing with old age and sickness, for example—I always find reading her blog to be a calming, softening experience. Enjoy our Q & A and make sure to check out the "Dalai Grandma" blog for her recent thoughts on the nirvana fallacy, Chogyam Trungpa, and her poetry (she's a published poet and author). More »