Zen

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    Help for the Environment (from an 8-3/4 year-old) Paid Member

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    Sweetcake Enso Art Exhibit Paid Member

    Sweetcake Enso is putting on a traveling art exhibition. There's a list of confirmed venues on the website. And Here's the press release, with a cool piece by one of the participating artists, Max Gimblett. The first call for submissions ended September 1: In American culture Zen is often represented by the Enso, a calligraphic circle, to the extent that the Enso can be regarded as a logo for a brand identity. However, the Enso is truly known for the singularity of the mark as an expression of both presentness and emptiness. Sweetcake Enso draws attention to the abstract circle as a symbol of presentness in daily life, and opens out the traditional calligraphy of the Enso to include the work of Buddhist artists that is thriving in the contemporary art context. Alongside of Zen Master Nonin Chowaney’s traditional calligraphy will be that of artists more internationally known in the contemporary art context, such as Sanford Biggers, Noah Fischer, and Max Gimblett. It will also include the work of local community artists, and is traveling from Zen center to Zen Center in order to showcase their work in the context of larger Buddhist community. There are currently five Zen Centers on the east coast that are participating in the exhibit: Empty Hand Zen Center, the Village Zendo, Brooklyn Zen Center, Zen Center of Syracuse, and the Rochester Zen Center; and two on the west, the Olympia Zen Center and the San Francisco Zen Center. More »
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    Daily Dharma: The Presence of the Present Paid Member

    Time can only disclose or unfold itself in our "now," and as it does, all of time and all the world unfolds too. They cannot be separated. We stand in the center of what Dogen calls “arraying ourselves” as simultaneous observers, participants, and creators. Fields, grass, flowers, and wind always appear in the “now” that is ever one and ever renewing. Dogen has a word for this unity: being-time, or uji. To be is to be time. “As the time right now is all there is,” Dogen writes, “each being-time is without exception entire time.” In the context of Dogen and, perhaps, much of Buddhist understanding, the presence of the present is the only time you have. - Adam Frank, "Time & Again" Elizabeth Mattis-Namgyel's Tricycle Retreat starts in five days on Tricycle.com! More »
  • 5 recent quotes from Thich Nhat Hanh in today's Guardian Paid Member

    In the current issue of Tricycle, contributing editor Andrew Cooper recounts his travels with Thich Nhat Hanh, the much beloved Vietnamese teacher, poet, peace advocate and environmentalist. Cooper's view is unique; charged with attending Thay, as he is called, on an early visit to the United States, Cooper offers an up-close-and-personal view of a man who changed—in fact, helped to shape—Buddhism in the West. Today's Guardian features a nice piece on Thay on the occasion of his visit to Nottingham, where he led nearly 1,000 people in walking meditation (above). Here are five outtakes: 1. "The situation the Earth is in today has been created by unmindful production and unmindful consumption. We consume to forget our worries and our anxieties. Tranquilizing ourselves with over-consumption is not the way." 2. More »
  • Buddhist Cafe Culture and "Happiness Classes" Paid Member

    Monks from Mt. Koya (Koyasan), a center of Shingon Buddhism, are coming into Tokyo to offer classes to harried city-dwellers in cafe setting. This immediately made me think of the city centers of American Zen Centers, where one can go during the week before heading out to the mountains for retreats and so on. But here, it's usually the more serious students who do the calligraphy as the women are doing in the photo above. More »
  • Eido Shimano Roshi and Zen Studies Society in the Times Paid Member

    Mark Oppenheimer covers the Eido Shimano Roshi story in The New York Times. He begins: Sooner or later, every traditional faith has to confront sexual impropriety by its spiritual leaders: extramarital sex, or sex with the wrong people (members of the congregation, minors) or, for supposedly celibate clergy, any sex at all. But there are great differences in how religions handle these transgressions. For Jews and many Protestants, it is the local congregation that decides what sins are too great to countenance, and what kind of discipline is needed. For Roman Catholics, a worldwide hierarchy decides, depending on reports from local representatives. And for Buddhists — well, the answer is not so clear. The root of the problem, some experts say, is that the teacher/student relationship in Buddhism has no obvious Western analogy. More »