Zen

  • Move over, Park 51, now the Buddhists want a temple! Paid Member

    I can't guess at how many Americans would support or oppose the building of a Buddhist temple in Walnut, California, but I do know that someone there in high places is against it. And the US government isn't too happy about it. The AP reports: LOS ANGELES — The U.S. Justice Department has filed a religious discrimination lawsuit against the Southern California city of Walnut, claiming it unfairly denied a permit to a group seeking to build and run a Buddhist center. More »
  • Green China? It's complicated... Paid Member

    "China provides a free environment for architects. We're not impeded by the complicated regional planning and bureaucratic red tape. Most importantly, China has great craftsmen who can help me visualize my architectural concepts." That's how American architect David Greenberg sees it, whose work for the past 12 years in China has been heavily influenced by his Zen practice. Greenberg was introduced to Zen in Hawaii by a Chinese master, who also suggested he learn the Tao. A recent work of Greenberg's is a treehouse "eco resort," overlooking the South China Sea, at the Nanshan Buddhist Culture Zone, Sanya, Hainan province. Greenberg is no fan of the Western-style buildings springing up across Chinese cities like mushrooms. As he tells xinhuanet.com: More »
  • Gary Snyder Interview (Earth Day 2009) Paid Member

    Here is a short interview with Gary Snyder, conducted by Adam Phillips for Earth Day 2009. Snyder—Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, Zen practitioner, and Beat legend—primarily discusses the environment. A small dose of the wisdom found in the interview: “A trail is only useful to get you to where you’re going to leave the trail.” Listen to Adam Phillips interview Gary Snyder here. For more Snyder, read his most recent Tricycle article, written with Nelson Foster, “The Fog of World War II.” More »
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    A message from Eido Shimano Paid Member

    We were sent a copy of the following message from Eido Shimano Roshi. It originally came from the office of the Zen Studies Society and was sent to Sangha members. We confirmed with ZSS that we would post it only with their approval. They gave it, and expressed the hope that it might reach readers who could not be contacted directly. September 7, 2010 Dear Friends, I would like to acknowledge the pain and unnecessary suffering you went through in your hearts due to my faults. I have a profound feeling of remorse for my actions. This August marked my 50th anniversary in the United States. During this half-century I have received so much from people the world over. Over time, I took your kindness for granted and arrogance grew in my heart. As a result, my sensitivity to feel the pain of others decreased. Now, as I reflect on the past, I realize how many people's feelings and trust in me were hurt by my words and deeds. More »
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    Help for the Environment (from an 8-3/4 year-old) Paid Member

  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Sweetcake Enso Art Exhibit Paid Member

    Sweetcake Enso is putting on a traveling art exhibition. There's a list of confirmed venues on the website. And Here's the press release, with a cool piece by one of the participating artists, Max Gimblett. The first call for submissions ended September 1: In American culture Zen is often represented by the Enso, a calligraphic circle, to the extent that the Enso can be regarded as a logo for a brand identity. However, the Enso is truly known for the singularity of the mark as an expression of both presentness and emptiness. Sweetcake Enso draws attention to the abstract circle as a symbol of presentness in daily life, and opens out the traditional calligraphy of the Enso to include the work of Buddhist artists that is thriving in the contemporary art context. Alongside of Zen Master Nonin Chowaney’s traditional calligraphy will be that of artists more internationally known in the contemporary art context, such as Sanford Biggers, Noah Fischer, and Max Gimblett. It will also include the work of local community artists, and is traveling from Zen center to Zen Center in order to showcase their work in the context of larger Buddhist community. There are currently five Zen Centers on the east coast that are participating in the exhibit: Empty Hand Zen Center, the Village Zendo, Brooklyn Zen Center, Zen Center of Syracuse, and the Rochester Zen Center; and two on the west, the Olympia Zen Center and the San Francisco Zen Center. More »