Zen

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Zen Pace Paid Member

    Wincing at waste, write pocket-noteson the innocent sides of used pages, savelong distance calls till Sunday, chasethe last slipping rice grain around your plateand even hurry slowly, actingalways with trustful slowness within,mourning even the loss of a friendwith that dignity in her spirit nevergone…you have no need but to move,sleep to waking, insult to lovehappening to happeningat the pace of a gradual smile, at the paceof the hammer-stroke heartthat proceeds to the nextfull beat, and then the next. Barry Spacks, a poet and painter, teaches writing and literature at the University of California, Santa Barbara. A busy man, he hurries slowly. More »
  • Faith in Mind Paid Member

      Attaining the Way is not difficult, Just avoid picking and choosing. If you have neither aversion nor desire, You’ll thoroughly understand. A hair’s breadth difference Is the gap between heaven and earth. If you want it to come forth Let there be no positive and negative. For such comparisons Are a sickness of the mind. More »
  • Knocking on Heaven's Door: Review & Event Paid Member

    "A Life Too Long" is a heart-wrenching story of terminal illness, modern medicine, and family. The article, adapted from Katy Butler's new book, Knocking on Heaven's Door, was a hit with the Tricycle community. And word is spreading. This week, The New York Times reviewed Butler's new book: More »
  • Wrong Mindfulness Paid Member

    Hozan Alan Senauke is a Soto Zen priest, activist, and the former director of Buddhist Peace Fellowship. He is an advisor to the International Network of Engaged Buddhists and founder of the Clear View Project, which focuses on social change and relief efforts in Asia. He also happens to be an accomplished folk musician. In March, Radio host John Malkin interviewed Senauke on his show “The Great Leap Forward” on Free Radio Santa Cruz. The two spoke about the confluence of Buddhism and social justice, Buddhist Anarchism, and where Engaged Buddhism stands today.   More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Consider the Source: Ordinary Mind Zen Paid Member

    Because the fundamental nature of consciousness, of mind itself, is without characteristics, Zen Buddhism teaches signlessness. Ordinary activity, reflected in the lives of monks or villagers, fully embodies this signless teaching about mind. This is the “Treasury of the True Dharma Eye, whose true sign is signlessness, the sublime Dharma gate,” as taught in Zen’s founding legend by the Buddha. The “sublime gate” of signlessness is not at all empty of meaning. Traditionally, taking Zen’s signless path leads first to perceiving, then seeing through, reincarnation, the “wheel of birth and death.” What is quite profound is then inextricable from what is entirely ordinary. It is passages about the “ordinary,” where the difference between sacred and mundane is forgotten, that Zen literature takes on its peculiar flavor. More »
  • Consider the Source: Origins of the Wild Goose Pagoda Paid Member

    Tourist groups that visit the Terra Cotta Warriors inevitably visit Xian’s other famous landmark, the Wild Goose Pagoda, an icon central to the development of Chinese Buddhism. In this post I will explore why the Wild Goose Pagoda is such an object of pride for the city of Xian, and its role in Chinese Buddhism’s development. For centuries, Buddhism entered China along the Silk Road, the legendary trade route that stretched from ancient Rome to Xian. This trade route passed directly through the region where Mahayana Buddhism developed, serving to convey Mahayana teachings to China. More »