Wisdom 2.0

  • More on mindfulness and technology Paid Member

    More from the New York Times on how the overuse of technology can be counterproductive: The technology makes the tiniest windows of time entertaining, and potentially productive. But scientists point to an unanticipated side effect: when people keep their brains busy with digital input, they are forfeiting downtime that could allow them to better learn and remember information, or come up with new ideas. Read the rest of “Digital Devices Deprive Brain of Needed Downtime.” In related news, the second Wisdom 2.0 Conference has been announced. From their website: There is little question that most of us will live "connected" to technology ... More »
  • 7 ways to use the internet to reduce suffering. Paid Member

    In a recent Bearing Witness Blog post entitled 7 ways to use the internet to reduce suffering, Ari Pliskin lists seven important points that were explored during the Wisdom 2.0 summit that took place earlier this year.  It is a very insightful, practical, and concise list and I recommend giving it a look. 1. Practice being present in person 2. Practice being present online 3. Build Relationships 4. Enforce accountability 5. Raise money and spread petitions More »
  • What Does a “Conscious Workplace” Look Like? Paid Member

    What does a “conscious workplace” look like? This isn’t just a question we ask ourselves at a small, nonprofit Buddhist organization like Tricycle. Increasingly, as a society, mindfulness in the workplace is an idea we are exploring and embracing. With high-profile companies like Google investing in projects like their School of Personal Growth (see Joan Duncan Oliver's "Buddha in the Googleplex" from Tricycle's Summer 2009 issue) it’s clear that the concept has gone mainstream. This Wisdom 2.0 interview with Gopi Kallayil, part of the Search Advertising Product Marketing Team at Google, sheds a little light on the question: what does a “conscious workplace” look like? More »