Tricycle

  • Buddhism diagrammed Paid Member

    Last time I wrote about a diagram outlining Buddhism I referred to it as "Buddhism in a nutshell" (see "A picture and a thousand words"). I won't make the mistake again—some cried foul because they felt the diagram was incomplete or biased. Well, I suppose that would have to be the case for any diagram claiming to outline the whole of Buddhism (although in this case, the author makes no such claim) but I like diagrams and enjoyed this one, by blogger Sabio Lantz at Triangulations. More »
  • Ponlop Rinpoche takes a stab at "the question that won't go away" Paid Member

    One year ago I wrote a post I called, "Is Buddhism a Religion? The Question that won't go away." I think it's clear now that the question will come round again and again. Along with "religion vs. spirituality," it seems to be a perennial favorite. Now, the esteemed Buddhist teacher Ponlop Rinpoche takes on the question in his recent Huffington Post column "Is Buddhism a Religion?" What he describes (as opposed to Stephen Batchelor's "Buddhism without beliefs") is a "Buddhism beyond religion." Since I tend to think of Buddhism as religion, I was very interested in reading his post and found it useful. More »
  • Who hijacked Himalayan art? Or any art, for that matter? Paid Member

    Himalayan Art Resources (HAR) is the most comprehensive collection of Himalayan art available, much of it Buddhist. For years now, Jeff Watt, HAR's director, has been exhorting us to understand and critique Himalayan art on its own merit—much as we might consider, say, a Fra Angelico—and rescue it from the theory-laden university art history departments. For support, Jeff refers us to to an article in yesterday's New York Times, in which Laurence Kantner, an expert in early Italian painting and former curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, has this to say: More »
  • Uproot the Core Problems Paid Member

    Today's Daily Dharma, In the Buddhist path we are bringing together our actions, our view, and our practice. It is a balance of awareness, insight, and action, working harmoniously together. In that way our energy is no longer divided or scattered, but we are fully present in whatever we do. That is what it means to be a genuine human being. More »
  • Dalai Lama: My Reincarnation Will Appear In Free Country Paid Member

    VIA P. Vijian at Bernama.com, DHARAMSALA, July 20 (Bernama) -- Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama believes his next reincarnation will be in a "free country", if the Tibetan crisis prolongs without a cordial solution. "If I die as a refugee and the Tibetan situation remains like this, then logically, my reincarnation will appear in a free country, because the very purpose of reincarnation is to carry on the work which began in my previous life. "And, there is some contribution, some fulfillment in work started in the previous life. Then, that is truly reincarnation," he told Bernama in a recent interview at his exile-base in Dharamsala in northern India. He said, if obstacles were created against carrying out the tasks of the Dalai Lama's previous life, than the "reality is not reincarnation." More »
  • Is it ok to say "the West"? Paid Member

    Editor-at-Large Andrew Cooper stopped by for a visit yesterday—quite a change from the Pacific Northwest, where he lives. The heat and rain are very familiar to him, though. He hails from the New York metro area. Still, he may miss the cool breezes off Puget Sound. Andy, web editor Phil Ryan and I got to talking (Phil was not distracted by the Shady Buddha during this meeting), and Phil noted that every time we use the term "Western Buddhism"—or even just "the West"—some people object. These comments have been helpful, forcing us to examine our use of the term. More »