Tricycle

  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Tricycle's New Direction Paid Member

    Just kidding! A friend forwarded me this image. I think it's pretty funny. It's from the Flickr stream of Tobyharriman. His page does say "©All Rights Reserved" but, then again, the same applies to our cover and logo and what not... This discovery lead me to do a bit more Google image digging and I found this piece by artist Nickolus Meisel, titled "Tricycle Magazine; The Buddhist Review" which apparently was on display at the Museum of Art/WSU as part of the WSU Fine Arts Faculty Exhibition in 2007. More »
  • Dinner, Quick & Mindful Paid Member

    If you're wondering what to cook up for Labor Day, our favorite chef, Wil Crutchley, has the answer: Sweet Potatoes with Black Bean Salad. We asked Wil to provide us with something healthy, environmentally conscious, affordable—and quick. And he delivered, and will every quarter. So take a look, and if you prepare it for yourself, let us know what you think. Click here for the recipe. You'll also find tips on where to buy the ingredients. Image: Ron Reeves More »
  • Gender equality gets a black eye, Jeff Bridges & the Dalai Lama Paid Member

    Amanda Brown at The Anti-Room isn't too happy with the Dalai Lama's follow-up to his own comment that his next incarnation could very well be female. I'd heard the first comment but not the second she cites (I'm usually better at staying on top of these things but have been quite slow on this one). Here's Amanda: Buddhism has long been held as being the acceptable religion by many left leaning liberals, who would also count themselves in favour of gender equality. It is therefore a bit depressing to note the Dalai Lama’s recent comments about the possibility of a woman succeeding him. He begins well enough. More »
  • 5 recent quotes from Thich Nhat Hanh in today's Guardian Paid Member

    In the current issue of Tricycle, contributing editor Andrew Cooper recounts his travels with Thich Nhat Hanh, the much beloved Vietnamese teacher, poet, peace advocate and environmentalist. Cooper's view is unique; charged with attending Thay, as he is called, on an early visit to the United States, Cooper offers an up-close-and-personal view of a man who changed—in fact, helped to shape—Buddhism in the West. Today's Guardian features a nice piece on Thay on the occasion of his visit to Nottingham, where he led nearly 1,000 people in walking meditation (above). Here are five outtakes: 1. "The situation the Earth is in today has been created by unmindful production and unmindful consumption. We consume to forget our worries and our anxieties. Tranquilizing ourselves with over-consumption is not the way." 2. More »
  • Buddhism diagrammed Paid Member

    Last time I wrote about a diagram outlining Buddhism I referred to it as "Buddhism in a nutshell" (see "A picture and a thousand words"). I won't make the mistake again—some cried foul because they felt the diagram was incomplete or biased. Well, I suppose that would have to be the case for any diagram claiming to outline the whole of Buddhism (although in this case, the author makes no such claim) but I like diagrams and enjoyed this one, by blogger Sabio Lantz at Triangulations. More »
  • Ponlop Rinpoche takes a stab at "the question that won't go away" Paid Member

    One year ago I wrote a post I called, "Is Buddhism a Religion? The Question that won't go away." I think it's clear now that the question will come round again and again. Along with "religion vs. spirituality," it seems to be a perennial favorite. Now, the esteemed Buddhist teacher Ponlop Rinpoche takes on the question in his recent Huffington Post column "Is Buddhism a Religion?" What he describes (as opposed to Stephen Batchelor's "Buddhism without beliefs") is a "Buddhism beyond religion." Since I tend to think of Buddhism as religion, I was very interested in reading his post and found it useful. More »