thich nhat hanh

  • Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Paid Member

    In the spirit in what would have been Martin Luther King Jr.’s 87th birthday, Tricycle asked Zenju Earthlyn Manuel, a Soto Zen Buddhist priest in the lineage of Shunryu Suzuki Roshi, what she has been thinking about on this year’s anniversary.   *** It's important that non-black teachers speak to the consciousness of hatred that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. went up against his entire life. As a Zen Buddhist priest of African descent, I have received many requests this weekend to speak, as if King were only speaking to black people or only black people understood what he said. If that's the case I see why his dream has thus far been deferred. What dream? More »
  • The Sangha without Thich Nhat Hanh Paid Member

    Thich Nhat Hanh leads students in a walking meditation at Blue Cliff Monastery in Pine Bush, NY. On November 11, 2014, the international Buddhist community was dealt a sudden blow when the Vietnamese monk Thich Nhat Hanh, a beloved teacher and prolific author, suffered a brain hemorrhage that rendered him unable to speak or walk. Since then, Thich Nhat Hanh (affectionately known by his students as “Thay”) has shown steady if small signs of recovery: swallowing solid food and more recently, uttering his first words. He is currently receiving treatment in San Francisco at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center.  More »
  • Talking Buddha, Talking Christ Paid Member

    Popemania may have moved on to the afterlife, but our memories of it endure: the wide-eyed references to Francis as a "rockstar," the jet-black Fiat, and yes, even the Popemojis. Papal pomp aside, perhaps the most memorable moment of the visit was the Pope's address to a joint session of Congress, in which he spoke pointedly about climate change, the arms trade, and the death penalty, among other issues.  More »
  • Bible Belt Buddhism Paid Member

    I live in the heart of the Bible Belt. When this article is published, many of my family and friends will fear I am destined for hell. Some Christians, like many others, misjudge what they do not understand. Some simply scratch their heads when they hear of a Christian examining Buddhism, meditation, or even just alternative experiences and faiths. Other Christians will have much stronger objections than that. I know this well, for there was a time when I was one of them. More »
  • Fear of Silence Paid Member

    I have the impression that many of us are afraid of silence. We’re always taking in something—text, music, radio, television, or thoughts—to occupy the space. If quiet and space are so important for our happiness, why don’t we make more room for them in our lives? One of my longtime students has a partner who is very kind, a good listener, and not overly talkative; but at home her partner always needs to have the radio or TV on, and he likes a newspaper in front of him while he sits and eats his breakfast. More »
  • Good Earth Day Paid Member

    Hello Earth. What can we say to you on a day like today—your day—when the glaciers are melting and the rivers are rising? That we're sorry? We know that you're sick. We know that we've taken advantage of you, that we're responsible for your dangerously high temperatures. Should we apologize to you on your big day? At a moment like this, would it be awkward if we said "Thank you"?On this Earth Day I'm thinking of something that Kurt Vonnegut wrote towards the end of his life. The crucified planet Earth, should it find a voice and a sense of irony, might now well say of our abuse of it, “Forgive them, Father. They know not what they do.” The irony would be that we know what we are doing. When the last living thing has died on account of us, how poetic it would be if Earth could say, in a voice floating up perhaps from the floor of the Grand Canyon, “It is done. People did not like it here.” More »