technology

  • The Chimera of Human Advancement Paid Member

    In The Zen Teachings of Homeless Kodo, three generations of dharma teachers grapple with the social and technological changes they witnessed in Japan over the course of their respective lifetimes. Kodo Sawaki, the eponymous "Homeless Kodo," first brought Soto Zen Buddhism out of the monasteries and into the streets during the early 1900s. His dharma heir, Kosho Uchiyama, continued this tradition during the latter half of that century. Now Shohaku Okamura, the title's translator and last commentator, applies the wisdom of his forebears to our present day.—Ed.Kodo Sawaki: After all our efforts, racking our brains as intensely as possible, we have come to a deadlock. Human beings are idiots. We set ourselves up as wise and then do foolish things. In spite of our scientific advancement, we haven’t yet achieved greatness of character. What’s the reason for this? More »
  • "Technology's Mindfulness Racket" Paid Member

    In a new article over at The New Republic, senior editor Evgeny Morozov questions the agendas of tech companies that advocate "unplugging" and technological solutions like apps in response to the digital onslaught that has become a fact of daily life. "We are being urged to unplug," writes Morozov in "The Mindfulness Racket," "so that we can resume our usual activities with even more vigor upon returning to the land of distraction." More »
  • Why I Disrupted the Wisdom 2.0 Conference Paid Member

    The invisibility of the crisis in San Francisco right now is reminiscent of that of the AIDS epidemic. To quote from Vito Russo, a founder of the AIDS activist group ACT UP, film historian, and rabble rouser, it’s “like living through a war which is happening only for those people who happen to be in the trenches.” He lived in this city when it was a haven for political radicals, queer people, artists, and immigrants, when it was America’s great city of sanctuary. “You look around and you discover that you’ve lost more of your friends, but nobody else notices,” he said. “It isn’t happening to them.” More »
  • Protesters crash Google talk on corporate mindfulness at Wisdom 2.0 conference Paid Member

    On Saturday morning at the Wisdom 2.0 conference in San Francisco, Karen May, vice president for "people development" at Google, was taken by surprise. Not long after she opened a panel discussion dubbed "3 Steps to Build Corporate Mindfulness the Google Way," protesters stormed the stage, unfurling a banner that read, "Eviction Free San Francisco." Lately, Bay Area activists have been blaming Google and other tech giants (and their allies in government) for displacing residents, and the annual gathering of Silicon Valley's mindful elite presented them with the perfect opportunity for protest.  More »
  • More on mindfulness and technology Paid Member

    More from the New York Times on how the overuse of technology can be counterproductive: The technology makes the tiniest windows of time entertaining, and potentially productive. But scientists point to an unanticipated side effect: when people keep their brains busy with digital input, they are forfeiting downtime that could allow them to better learn and remember information, or come up with new ideas. Read the rest of “Digital Devices Deprive Brain of Needed Downtime.” In related news, the second Wisdom 2.0 Conference has been announced. From their website: There is little question that most of us will live "connected" to technology ... More »
  • Do Less & Accomplish More Paid Member

    I'm sure multitasking has made me dumber and the NYT's lead this morning just confirmed my suspicions. But if Anna's post below disheartens you, here's the antidote: Marc Lesser's "Do Less & Accomplish More." Lesser offers step-by-step practical advice for making the most of your time. My own tip: Consider turning off TweetDeck, and let me know if you do: I haven't managed to pull the plug on it yet. More »