Shambhala

  • David Nichtern on the Future of Buddhism in the West Paid Member

    VIA the Huffington Post, The essence of Buddhism, I think most Buddhists would agree, is to cultivate awareness and compassion and to explore our existence in an open and unbiased way. In some sense Buddhism has always been what we Westerners would consider a fusion of religion and science. There are no articles of faith, there is no dogma, nothing to believe without verification. Buddhism is considered a non-theistic tradition, and from that point of view it should mix well with scientific, technological and rationalist thought. More »
  • Acharya Judy Lief on Gratitude Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. More »
  • Uproot the Core Problems Paid Member

    Today's Daily Dharma, In the Buddhist path we are bringing together our actions, our view, and our practice. It is a balance of awareness, insight, and action, working harmoniously together. In that way our energy is no longer divided or scattered, but we are fully present in whatever we do. That is what it means to be a genuine human being. More »
  • Acharya Judy Lief on Working with Labels and Reactions Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. 8. Three objects, three poisons, and three seeds of virtue. More »
  • Judy Lief on Absolute and Relative Bodhichitta Paid Member

    We're very lucky to have Acharya Judy Lief writing commentary on the lojong (mind-training) slogans at tricycle.com. As she writes in her introduction to Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche's classic Training the Mind, "Through slogan practice, we begin to realize that our habitual tendency, even in our smallest gestures, is one of self-centeredness." She also writes that the slogans "form a loop in which nothing is excluded." The playful and sometimes ironic tone of the slogans should not fool us: Lojong is a complete path of practice all on its own. She has a new post up today discussing absolute and relative bodhichitta, in which she writes: More »
  • "The Discovery of Egolessness" by David Nichtern Paid Member

    Via the Huffington Post, "The entire Buddhist path is based on the discovery of egolessness and the maturing of insightor knowledge that comes from egolessness." --- Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche / Journey Without Goal I have heard many times from students and spiritual practitioners of all kinds, shapes and sizes, that if they could only "get rid of their ego," then they could have some peace and taste enlightenment. There are also many "self-help" teachings and gurus who are promoting techniques to "strengthen" the ego -- to ripen and develop one's sense of power, accomplishment and tangible assets -- make you skinnier, more assertive, richer, happier, etc. etc. etc. But the approaches of getting rid of OR strengthening the ego may both share a similar delusion: that it actually exists in some solid and fixed way in the first place. More »